Tag: automobiles

Car Crazy #3: 1960 Dodge Polara

Car Crazy #3: 1960 Dodge Polara

Photography
The Dodge Polara was an automobile introduced in the United States for the 1960 model year as Dodge's top-of-the-line full-size car; after the introduction of the Dodge Custom 880 in 1962, the Polara nameplate designated a step below the full sized, best trimmed Dodge model. In its various forms, the Polara name was used by Dodge until 1973, when its position in Dodge's line-up was replaced by the Dodge Monaco. The name Polara is a reference to the Polaris star, in a marketing attempt to appeal to the excitement surrounding the Space Race during the early 1960s. The Polara was a competitor to the Ford Galaxie 500 and the Chevrolet Impala.
Here’s A Classic Disney Hudson TV Ad Featuring Donald Duck

Here’s A Classic Disney Hudson TV Ad Featuring Donald Duck

Advertising, Auction Finds
Long before the Walt Disney Company became known not just as a purveyor of magic but as a corporate behemoth, they tried their hand at television advertising. In the early-to-mid 1950s, Disney produced a series of fantastic TV ads featuring classic characters like Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, and Tinker Bell, as well as original product-specific characters. This great ad and animation cel come from a spot for what I believe to be the 1955 American Motors Hudson Hornet, and feature Donald Duck and his nephews Huey, Dewey, and Louie. The designer was Tom Oreb, who worked with Disney during what was arguably their golden age for feature productions. First, let's look at the Hudson Hornet ad. I'm not 100% certain what model year this is for, as the sources I've seen for this animation vary...
Congrats to Lexus on the Most Obnoxious Holiday Commercials of All-Time

Congrats to Lexus on the Most Obnoxious Holiday Commercials of All-Time

Advertising
Lexus, a perennial contender for the most annoying holiday commercials of the year, has roared back to the top of my Most Hated Christmas Commercial list in 2011 for all-time after being temporarily dethroned in 2010 by the Hyundai Hipsters. Incredibly, they've found a way to amp up the obnoxiousness even more this time by playing cutesy with their stupid "December to Remember" jingle. If you haven't seen this spot from 2011, get a barf bag handy: Look, I don't normally encourage class jealousy or class warfare, but this is just fucking ridiculous. Who exactly does this campaign appeal to, if not privileged, upper-class white people without an ounce of shame? At least this year's Acura holiday ads try to be funny. If it makes you feel any better, feel free to sing along with
Angela Dorian’s Playboy Playmate Pink 1968 AMX

Angela Dorian’s Playboy Playmate Pink 1968 AMX

Photography
According to at least one source, in 1964 Playboy magazine started giving away so-called Playmate Pink automobiles as prizes to the women selected as Playmate of the Year. For 1968, Angela Dorian -- born Victoria Vetri -- was given the honor and a brand-new 1968 pink AMC AMX, the first model year for the sports car. This AMX was powered by the base 290 V8 with automatic transmission, air conditioning, tilt wheel, AM/8-track radio and optional rear bumper guards. In addition to the paint job, this car differed from other AMXs in that its dashboard number plate contained Dorian's measurements, making her car AMX 36-24-35. According to my exhaustive internet sleuthing, Dorian still owns the car, which is now black. At least that's as of 2010, when she was arrested for attempted murd...
Concept Car Capsule: 1955 Chevrolet Biscayne

Concept Car Capsule: 1955 Chevrolet Biscayne

Capsules
Three years before Chevrolet introduced the Biscayne model to its new car lineup, it debuted as a rather interesting concept car design at the 1955 General Motors Motorama car show. It's fascinating for a few reasons. First, it stood in clear contrast to the growing trend of making American cars bigger and flashier. Secondly, it was a curious mix of styles, incorporating aspects of the then-current Corvette with a glimpse of the Corvair to come. Of course, as with the Edsel, your eyes are immediately drawn to the front of the Biscayne. The odd headlamp placement and Jaws-like grill styling were bold, to say the least. The '55 certainly bore precious little resemblance to the production model that rolled off the assembly line in 1958, as you will see in the final image in this gallery. ...
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 31: Classic American Cars (1930s – 1970s) Part 1

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 31: Classic American Cars (1930s – 1970s) Part 1

Vintage Photo Wednesday
One of my favorite past-times is combing the vast archive of press wire photos on eBay. I've found all sorts of neat things there, but one of my current obsessions is old automobile press photography. So here is the first of what I hope will be many galleries featuring ten classic American cars, mainly from the mid-century period. Apologies in advance if I get some of the years or models wrong -- I can only go off what the original auction listed. Also, those marks you see on some of the photos are original editorial markings, so you know these are 100% real! For much more detailed looks at classic American cars, check out my ad galleries for the 1970 Dodge, 1975 Chevrolet, and 1982 AMC lineups. (Click on any picture for the full size.) If anyone can tell me what the model is
You Know You Want This Styx Van from 1979, So Don’t Pretend Otherwise

You Know You Want This Styx Van from 1979, So Don’t Pretend Otherwise

Retrotisements
Straight out of a Billboard magazine issue from February 1979 comes this groovy beauty: Laugh all you want, but this made total sense in '79. Styx was huge at the time, having released the successful Pieces of Eight album in September 1978. It was one in a string of multi-platinum records for the band. So who wouldn't want to rock the paradise with a painted Styx van featuring album art from Pieces of Eight and The Grand Illusion? I'd like one of the tour jackets too, please. Hell, I'd drive one of those bad boys around today. You can keep the Betamax player though.
Ads from the Open Road, Volume 1

Ads from the Open Road, Volume 1

Retrotisements
I don't really pay much attention to billboard advertisements while I'm driving, unless it's something fairly snappy or unique. And as much as I'd like to romanticize old billboard ads, I think the medium as a whole has been fairly bereft of great ideas. And if you think about it, it makes sense. You're only going to see a billboard ad clearly for what, four or five seconds? So it's all about economy of ideas and design. Anything too complicated and you either lose a driver's interest or cause a 20-car pileup. Neither is good for business. I'm not holding this group of classic billboard ads up as the best ever, but I think you'll enjoy them nonetheless. These are all courtesy the Duke University Libraries Digital Collections advertising series. I can't decide which part of...