Tag: blues rock

Album cover of the week: Ike and Tina Turner — Outta Season

Album cover of the week: Ike and Tina Turner — Outta Season

Album Cover of the Week, Music
As provocative album covers go, Ike and Tina Turner's Outta Season LP has to be one of the greats. The image of the couple eating watermelon while wearing whiteface -- a brilliant mockery of blackface minstrelsy -- would be controversial now, so the fact that this was released in 1968 is even more amazing. Not surprisingly, the foreign versions of Outta Season featured much more unimaginative album art. I don't know if they featured the super sexy gatefold picture the original U.S. edition (on Blue Thumb Records) had.
Get to Know… David Lee Roth

Get to Know… David Lee Roth

Music
For a brief time following David Lee Roth's acrimonious departure from Van Halen in 1985, it seemed the flamboyant frontman would be able to match his former band mates step for step. But as the 1990s rolled on, Roth's commercial fortunes declined and he became a punchline of sorts. Quicker than you could say "bozedy bozedy bop!" Diamond Dave went from headlining arena shows to rolling out a much-ridiculed Las Vegas lounge act and getting busted for buying pot in New York City. And the less said about the short-lived 1996 Van Halen reunion the better. But defying all expectations, David Lee Roth officially came home to VH in 2007. The band -- with Eddie's son Wolfgang replacing Michael Anthony on bass -- hit the road in September of that year and raked in an astounding $93 million b
The Music Year That Was: The Best Albums of 2011

The Music Year That Was: The Best Albums of 2011

Music
The usual disclaimers about my year-end music lists still apply. I'm only one man and only have so much time to listen to new albums. So even if I hear an album and it's really good, if nothing about it grabs me right away I may end up forgetting it. Also, naturally I'm going to gravitate toward music either from acts I already know and like or that's recommended by friends and writers/critics I respect. These, then, are the ten albums that I have returned to more than any other in 2011 and probably will in 2012. Because at the end of the day, isn't that the only mark of a good record? #1. Mastodon, The Hunter As much as I was disappointed with Crack the Skye, I absolutely love The Hunter. I've read a lot of comparisons between it and Metallica's "Black Album," and I can see why. It's...
My favorite music: 1983

My favorite music: 1983

Music
If there's one thing the internet lacks, it's pointless music lists. So to fill that void, here's a sampling of my favorite albums from some random year. Let's say, 1983. (Spotify users, check out the accompanying playlist and subscribe!) Robert Plant, The Principle of Moments -- While I would in no way claim that Robert Plant's solo output bests Led Zeppelin's music, a lot of times I simply prefer to listen to Plant. In fact I'd say that Plant has enjoyed one of the most artistically rewarding solo careers of any artist who was part of a popular band that I can think of. The Principle of Moments is probably my favorite Plant solo effort (next to Fate of Nations) -- he sounds freed from the constraints of creating larger-than-life rock and the music just crackles with energy. "In the...
So fresh — 10 Led Zeppelin songs that will never get old

So fresh — 10 Led Zeppelin songs that will never get old

Music
If you listen to classic rock radio enough, you'd think that the only songs Led Zeppelin recorded were "The Ocean, "Whole Lotta Love," or "Over the Hills and Far Away." As much as I love those songs, enough already. The good news is that despite a lot of Zep's catalog being way overexposed, plenty of their songs still sound fresh to this day. So here's a list of 10 Led Zeppelin cuts that will never, ever get old. 1 -- "Poor Tom" (from Coda, 1982) It's hard to imagine Led Zeppelin III being any better, but this track (recorded during those sessions) would've done just that. Above all else -- Robert Plant's understated vocals or Jimmy Page's delicate acoustic guitar -- John Bonham's ridiculously bouncy drumming makes this track. 2 -- "Communication Breakdown" (from Led Ze...
Album cover of the week: Grinding Stone

Album cover of the week: Grinding Stone

Album Cover of the Week, Music
This week's selection is a small tribute to the late, great Gary Moore, who died yesterday at age 58.  It's the cover art for Moore's first solo record, 1973's Grinding Stone (released under the moniker of The Gary Moore Band). OK so it's not the most subtle cover in the world, what with its phallus-centric art (courtesy Michael Farrel).  I'm also pretty sure that if the rather excited young lass on the left were real, she would be dead within minutes due to severe compression of her internal organs. In addition to a productive solo career, Moore collaborated with a number of excellent artists.  Most notably he played with fellow Irish rockers Thin Lizzy, with whom he released the excellent 1979 album Black Rose: A Rock Legend.  If you listen to nothing else Moore worked on, list
Album cover of the week: Beck-Ola

Album cover of the week: Beck-Ola

Album Cover of the Week
There's not much room for expounding on this week's entry, 1969's Beck-Ola, the second and final album from the first incarnation of the Jeff Beck Group.  It's a giant apple in a room.  Very simple, very cool-looking. The album art is a reproduction the second version of The Listening Room (1958) by the Belgian surrealist René Magritte.  The first (1952) has the apple in a wooden room.  Magritte's work enjoyed a resurgence of popularity in the '60s and '70s thanks to its inclusion on other album covers, as well as by album covers inspired by his work. Perhaps of even more interest is the note included on the original album's back cover - "Today, with all the hard competition in the music business, it's almost impossible to come up with anything totally original. So we haven't. Ho
Album review: The Raconteurs – Consolers of the Lonely

Album review: The Raconteurs – Consolers of the Lonely

Music
I'm not sure if it can accurately be said that the Raconteurs' new album, Consolers of the Lonely, represents an unexpected left turn. After all, who's to say that their 2006 debut, Broken Boy Soldiers, isn't the aberration instead? Either way, fans looking for a repeat of the brilliant, trippy power pop of BBS would do best to just stick with that album. Consolers - steeped as it is in the blues, hard rock, and even vintage country - is an altogether different experience, so I expect the critics and fans to start taking sides now. The good news is that despite representing a radical departure in style, Consolers has groove and guts to spare, and it feels like a much more cohesive musical statement than BBS. Throughout, the Raconteurs play with supreme confidence and sounds like a...