Tag: indie pop

Listening Booth — Jim Noir, “Tea”

Listening Booth — Jim Noir, “Tea”

Listening Booth, Music
Longtime GFS readers know that I'm a Jim Noir fan, and have been for years. So it tickles me that he has a new album -- Jimmy's Show -- coming out in September. Here's the lead single and video from the album, "Tea." The song is typical Noir -- bouncy, fun, and full of quirky production flourishes and sterling, multi-tracked vocal harmonies. The video is... well, just watch. I've said it before and I'll say it again: the British are weird. But in a good way. Jimmy's Show is out September 17, and you can pre-order it from Jim Noir's website now. Hopefully the single will be available on Spotify soon.
Track By Track: Field Music — Plumb

Track By Track: Field Music — Plumb

Music
Because I dread the thought of writing yet another album review where I spend hundreds of words trying to frame an album in the proper context, or where I try to find yet another way to write about chord progressions, I’m just going to take it one song at a time and share my first impressions. So here we go with the fourth studio album from Field Music, Plumb. I'm still really digging the new Van Halen album, so this is a pretty significant gear shift. But as loyal readers should know, Field Music is easily my favorite "modern" band out there, so I'm gonna make it happen. This is a good time to be a Field Music fan, as the Brewis brothers have kept a pretty busy schedule since their 2005 debut album was released. Unfortunately it seems as if the group will not be coming to America to
Listening booth — Field Music,  “(I Keep Thinking About) A New Thing”

Listening booth — Field Music, “(I Keep Thinking About) A New Thing”

Listening Booth, Music
I now have a reason to stay alive until February 2012, because that's when the next Field Music album -- Plumb -- will be released. More specifically, February 13 in the U.K. and February 14 (Valentine's Day) in the U.S. The lads have been kind enough to provide a sneak peek of Plumb, courtesy an advance single release of "(I Keep Thinking About) A New Thing." You can enter your email address to download the song on Field Music's website (as well as place your pre-order for the album and check out upcoming tour dates), or you can check it out here! Field Music - (I Keep Thinking About) A New Thing by memphisindustries I dig it. It definitely carries the sound of the Measure album forward. Love that booming, slightly fuzzy bass part. Is it February yet?
Album cover of the week: Hotel Shampoo

Album cover of the week: Hotel Shampoo

Album Cover of the Week, Music
The internet is the greatest thing for discovering new music since... well I'm not sure. But thanks to Turntable.fm I found out about a neat album by Gruff Rhys, front man for Super Furry Animals. It's called Hotel Shampoo and it's got one heck of a neat album cover. Not much I can add here. The concept is simple -- the song's titles are presented as items for sale and their lengths shown as prices -- but it's very well executed. Graphic design credit goes to Pete Fowler, who has worked with Rhys and Super Furry Animals before. As an extra treat, the vinyl edition has a message for us. Stamped on the Side A center ring is "YOU CANNOT DO MUCH ABOUT THE LENGTH OF YOUR LIFE" and on Side B is "BUT YOU CAN DO A LOT ABOUT THE DEPTH AND WIDTH". Indeed. Related articles Gruff Rhys -...
Why the Hell Should I Like… Field Music? (The Rebuttal)

Why the Hell Should I Like… Field Music? (The Rebuttal)

Music
“Why the hell should I like… ?” is an experiment of sorts between Popblerd and The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. What we’re going to attempt to do is to pick 10 songs from our favorite artists — one for which the other has professed dislike or disinterest — and show them why they’re wrong. Well, I have to admit. The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit got me this time. For our latest "Why the Hell Should I Like?" column, he didn't pick an artist or band I didn't like or wasn't interested in -- he picked a band I'd never even heard of! What the hell? After perusing the primer that Gray Flannel Suit had so thoughtfully prepared for me and after doing a little bit of my own research, I picked up a little more knowledge. The band's core consists of brothers David and Peter Brewis, along wit
Listening booth — Dengue Fever, “Cement Slippers”

Listening booth — Dengue Fever, “Cement Slippers”

Listening Booth, Music
It's been entirely too long since Dengue Fever released their last studio album, 2008's excellent Venus on Earth. That album, if you remember, earned a coveted slot on my year-end Best Of list for '08. But the wait will be over on April 19, when the group is slated to release Cannibal Courtship via Fantasy Records/Concord Music Group. Of course you can pre-order the album on Amazon, but I've got an .mp3 of the first single for your listening pleasure. It's the second track, "Cement Shoes," and it's a burner. The group's signature style -- vintage 1960s Cambodian rock mingled with surf music and a bit of lounge thrown in for good measure -- is here, but sounds beefier than before. The dual vocals of guitarist Zac Holtzman and Cambodian chanteuse Chhom Nimol also work for me in a big w...
Gray Flannel Mixtape: Power Pop for Now People

Gray Flannel Mixtape: Power Pop for Now People

Music
Ask a dozen people to define the term "power pop" and you'll likely get a dozen variations of the same concept. For my part, any music with killer melodies, crisp songwriting and arranging, and (usually) big guitars probably qualifies. Or to get more specific, here's what the All Music Guide says: Power Pop is a cross between the crunching hard rock of the Who and the sweet melodicism of the Beatles and Beach Boys, with the ringing guitars of the Byrds thrown in for good measure. Yeah, that's about it. So anyway, power pop probably offers more value for your listening dollar than any other style I can think of. Here is but a handful of some of the most choice power pop ever committed to tape. 1. Nick Lowe, "So It Goes" (from Jesus of Cool, 1978) — Power pop aficionados will recogn
Album review: Iron & Wine — Kiss Each Other Clean

Album review: Iron & Wine — Kiss Each Other Clean

Music
I’m not sure that it’s possible for a stylistic change to be signaled faster than Iron & Wine does on Kiss Each Other Clean. Granted, four years have passed since the last proper album from singer/songwriter Sam Beam hit record store shelves — and even that one had begun to stray from his formula of acoustic guitar and hushed vocals — but the slight departure taken with the accompaniment on The Shepherd’s Dog is nothing compared to the leap taken here. With the first few notes of opener “Walking Far From Home,” all preconceptions of what defines an Iron & Wine album are shattered. Beam is not merely going to add a few instruments to create a more fleshed out sound — he’s headed to the studio with saxophones, synthesizers, flutes, and even some vocal tweaking. While 2007’s The
2010 – The year in recorded musical performances

2010 – The year in recorded musical performances

Music
I really need to find a way to turn music listening into a paying, full-time gig.  Because that's the only way I could ever hope to have time to take in all the good (and not-so-good) music that comes out every year.  Life really was much simpler when I didn't even want to make time for anything that wasn't by Kiss, Rush, or Iron Maiden.  So instead of approaching this as a "Best Albums of 2010" or "Best Music of 2010" list, it's more of a "My Favorite Albums/Music of 2010 That I Had Time to Listen To" list.  These are the albums that moved me one way or another this year, although obviously this is not (and cannot be) an exhaustive list.  I'm sure lots of really swell records got left off, but that's why there are other year-end lists on the internet, right? #10. Kanye West, My Beautiful