Tag: .mp3

Sunday Jazz: The Cannonball Adderley Quintet, “Walk Tall”

Sunday Jazz: The Cannonball Adderley Quintet, “Walk Tall”

Music, Sunday Jazz
One of the things I've always loved about Cannonball Adderley's approach to jazz is how he seamlessly infused elements of R&B and (later) soul into his arrangements. While he could play straight hard bop with the best of them, I think his best output comes from his willingness to expand and experiment. And so this week I want to highlight a song from Cannonball's his first album of the 1970s, Country Preacher (Capitol Records SKAO-404, 1970). It was recorded live in Chicago in October 1969. After a fiery introduction by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Adderley's quintet -- Cannonball on alto sax, Nat Adderley on cornet, Joe Zawinul on piano, Walter Booker on bass, and Roy McCurdy on drums -- busts out a greasy funk-inspired groove on "Walk Tall." This brilliant mix of late '60s funk and...
Listening Booth — Rush at Stadhalle, Offenbach, Germany (May 28, 1979)

Listening Booth — Rush at Stadhalle, Offenbach, Germany (May 28, 1979)

Listening Booth, Music
I can't believe I didn't think of this sooner, but it's high time I posted a Rush show on this site for the first time. After all, they finally made it into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it only seems right. And so inspired by my friends at Addicted to Vinyl sharing an excellent concert from the band's first album tour, I'm sharing one of favorites. This concert was recorded at the Stadhalle in Offenbach, West Germany on May 28, 1979 -- the second-to-last date on the Hemispheres tour. It goes by several names, but the copy I have is called Black Forest. It's a fantastic soundboard recording and the band is, as usual, on fire. Of note is that the entire "Hemispheres" suite is played, as is all of  "2112." Some of the transitions are rather abrupt, but otherwise this is an extreme
Comic Caption Contest #1 — Diary Secrets

Comic Caption Contest #1 — Diary Secrets

Ephemera
To commemorate my Facebook page passing 200 Likes, I've unveiling a new contest series! It's pretty simple really -- I've blanked some dialogue from a comic book panel and it's up to one of you, my loyal fans, to write your own. I'd rather it be funny or clever in some way, so let's keep it light. Here's the first contest panel: The fine print: I'll judge the entries personally and announce a winner no later than 4pm Eastern on Friday, April 24. The winner receives a free .mp3! To enter your caption, just head over to the GFS Facebook Fan Page -- click Like if you haven't done so already -- and show me what you got. Only one entry per person will be accepted, and you must be a fan of the Facebook page.
Music from the Worst Album Covers — Devastatin’ Dave, “Zip Zap Rap”

Music from the Worst Album Covers — Devastatin’ Dave, “Zip Zap Rap”

Album Cover of the Week, Music
We've all seen at least one article showing the worst album covers of all-time. But what about the music? Should you judge an album by its horrible cover? Well in this series, we’re going to find out. Today we examine "Zip Zap Rap" by Devastatin' Dave (The Turntable Slave). Precious little is documented about the artist known to us only as Devastatin' Dave (The Turntable Slave). His sole legacy on earth -- according to the internet anyway -- seems to be a lone release, the "Zip Zap Rap" vinyl single. It was released in 1986 on the Superstar International Records label, a short-lived imprint out of California whose biggest artist was Scherrie Payne of the Supremes. The single cover and center rings offer little help in uncovering the identity of the man behind the bitchin' red
Sunday Jazz: First Cosins Jazz Ensemble, ‘For the Cos of Jazz’

Sunday Jazz: First Cosins Jazz Ensemble, ‘For the Cos of Jazz’

Music, Sunday Jazz
This album has been making the rounds on jazz .mp3 blogs for quite a few years, but I like it so much I feel compelled to share it myself. It's called For the Cos of Jazz, and it was recorded by a group called the First Cosins Jazz Ensemble. As far as I can tell the group was a one-off project put together just for this album. As the name of the group and album might hint, Bill Cosby was a major figure in putting this together -- which makes sense, as he was pretty involved in the music world in the '60s and '70s in addition to his acting and stand-up comedy career. Indeed, Cosby is listed as a musical consultant and co-arranger on the record. Musically, For the Cos of Jazz is pretty typical of the jazz/funk that was popular in the mid-to-late '70s. It brings to mind one of my favori...
Listening booth — Van Halen, “I’m So Glad” (Caracas, Venezuela 1/16/83)

Listening booth — Van Halen, “I’m So Glad” (Caracas, Venezuela 1/16/83)

Listening Booth, Music
Guess what? I got Van Halen fever, and the only prescription is... more Van Halen! So here's one of my favorite VH boots, from the Diver Down promotional tour (dubbed the Hide Your Sheep Tour). It's I'm So Glad, a mono soundboard show sourced from the first night of the South American leg. It was the first of three shows in Caracas, Venezuela. The sound quality isn't fantastic for a soundboard, but it's a great setlist and the band is totally raging. I'm sure that playing in South America for the first time lit a fire under their collective asses. Eddie is in peak form as you would expect, while Alex and Michael are rock-solid as usual. As for Diamond Dave? Well, Dave is Dave. You know what to expect when you go to see VH with him as frontman, so you either love it or hate it. I lov
Album Cover of the Week: Space Age Santa Claus

Album Cover of the Week: Space Age Santa Claus

Album Cover of the Week, Music
This cover has made the rounds for at least a few years, but I just stumbled upon it this year. It's a delicious slice of mid-century Christmas cheer called Space Age Santa Claus. According to the entry on this 45 rpm single (on a FaLaLaLaLa.com post that is now only available through Google cache), "Space Age Santa Claus" is the A-side of this single (from Delhi Records, 1961), and the B-side is "When Christmas Bells Are Ringing." Both tunes were written by Ross Christman -- which sure sounds like a pseudonym to me -- and performed by the Hal Bradley Orchestra with Patty Marie Jay on vocals. I'm a little confused as to the perspective in this drawing. Is that a regular-sized Santa holding a really small tree? Or is the tree normal and Santa is just colossal? Because if it's the
My favorite music: 1983

My favorite music: 1983

Music
If there's one thing the internet lacks, it's pointless music lists. So to fill that void, here's a sampling of my favorite albums from some random year. Let's say, 1983. (Spotify users, check out the accompanying playlist and subscribe!) Robert Plant, The Principle of Moments -- While I would in no way claim that Robert Plant's solo output bests Led Zeppelin's music, a lot of times I simply prefer to listen to Plant. In fact I'd say that Plant has enjoyed one of the most artistically rewarding solo careers of any artist who was part of a popular band that I can think of. The Principle of Moments is probably my favorite Plant solo effort (next to Fate of Nations) -- he sounds freed from the constraints of creating larger-than-life rock and the music just crackles with energy. "In the...
So fresh — 10 Billy Joel songs that will never get old

So fresh — 10 Billy Joel songs that will never get old

Music
If you came here expecting or hoping to find an article bashing Billy Joel as an overrated, mediocre pop songwriter, you've come to the wrong place friend. I happen to love the man's music -- most of it anyway -- and think he takes an unfair slagging from hipper-than-thou music critics and fans. Sure, he hasn't exactly helped his case with his less-than-stellar later material and his troubled personal life. But buried in 13 studio releases are some of the best pop music of the '70s and '80s. I've gone through those albums -- having listened to them for years -- and picked ten songs that represent Joel at his best. I've tried to avoid including his biggest hits, although in some cases those are his best songs. Enjoy! 1 -- "Don't Ask Me Why" (from Glass Houses, 1980) This is the tune...