Tag: New York City

What City and State Has Lost the Most Sports Teams?

What City and State Has Lost the Most Sports Teams?

Sports
When we talk about "cursed" sports towns, it's almost always in the context of things like postseason or championship droughts, heartbreaking losses, or just general futility. In other words, Cleveland. I kid, I kid. But to my way of thinking there's something even worse than falling just short of ultimate glory over and over again, and that's losing a pro franchise entirely. Whether it's the result of a greedy owner or a lack of fan interest, the death of a sports team is always at least a little sad. And so I set out to document just with cities and states have lost the most professional teams from the four major leagues (NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL). I could expand it to other leagues as well, but I'm not sure that cities mourn the loss of indoor soccer teams quite like they do basebal...
The New York State Pavilion Gets Its Day in the Sun

The New York State Pavilion Gets Its Day in the Sun

Featured Posts, Mental Debris
I was not born until a decade after the 1964-65 New York World's Fair ended, so I've only ever been able to experience it through home movies, photographs, and postcards. Having never attended a World's Fair in the United States -- the last of which was held in 1984 -- it's always been a little difficult to understand the spell that those events cast over millions of Americans in the 20th century. The most visible remnants of that once-glittering spectacle in Queens are the Unisphere, which sits a stone's throw from Citi Field, and the New York State Pavilion. The Pavilion, actually comprised of three distinct elements -- the Tent of Tomorrow, a trio of concrete observation towers, and the Theaterama -- has been abandoned since the 1970s, its metal portions rusting and its paint fading.
Listening Booth — Kiss New York City Loft Rehearsal, 1973

Listening Booth — Kiss New York City Loft Rehearsal, 1973

Listening Booth, Music
Well, today's the big day. After years of waiting, and a whole lot of politics and gossip in the meantime, Kiss is finally being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. And so I felt it only appropriate to publish the first edition of the Listening Booth in more than a year. And this one should be a real treat for devoted members of the Kiss Army. Today's offering is a bootleg from the earliest days of the band, before they even had an album out. Hell, when this was recorded no one outside the immediate New York City area even knew who Kiss was. This recording, my friends, was reportedly made by Gene Simmons while the band played for an audience of no one in their New York City rehearsal loft (located at 10 East 23rd Street). What you will hear on this is a band still gelli...
Let’s Examine This Vintage 1956 New York City Street Scene Photo

Let’s Examine This Vintage 1956 New York City Street Scene Photo

Photography
From the furthest reaches of the internet comes this outstanding photograph, taken in 1956 in midtown Manhattan, New York City -- Times Square to be specific. Drink in the details (click for a larger version), and then let's talk about what's on here. Gorgeous, isn't it? Of course there are vintage cars and clothes aplenty, but let's focus on some of the other details instead. Here's what I can pick out from this picture, starting from the upper left: Some kind of travel billboard, likely either for air or rail. This part is too blurry for me to tell anything else. Giant ad for the Western movie Jubal, which according to IMDB was released on April 6, 1956. The ad plays up co-star Ernest Borgnine, who had just received the Academy Award for Best Actor a few weeks earlier for hi...
An Exploded View Drawing of Madison Square Garden, 1967

An Exploded View Drawing of Madison Square Garden, 1967

History
According to this Deadspin article, New York City has basically given the owners of Madison Square Garden ten years to find a new place to play. The arena, which is the fourth to bear that name, opened on February 11, 1968 on the site formerly occupied by the above-ground portion of Penn Station. Apparently New York wants to undo that architectural crime, and so here we are. Not to get all nostalgic or anything, but I thought it worth taking a quick look back at MSG IV's early days. Here's a neat exploded view drawing of the Garden from the November 1967 issue of Popular Mechanics. It shows the main areas of the building by function.
Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1958 – 1992)

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1958 – 1992)

Ephemera
Back for more, eh? As the follow-up to my set of World's Fair postcards covering the first half of the 20th century, here is the second half. This set picks up with Expo 58 in Brussels, which marked the first World's Fair held after World War II. Expo 58 (Brussels, Belgium) Century 21 Exposition (Seattle, 1962) (via Drive-In Mike) 1964 New York's World Fair (via The Pie Shops) Expo 67 (Montreal) (via The Pie Shops) HemisFair '68 (San Antonio, Texas) (via zawleski) Expo '70 (Osaka, Japan) (via Duncan Brown) Expo '74 (Spokane, Washington) (via The Pie Shops) Expo '75 (Okinawa, Japan) (via World's Fair Photos) 1982 World's Fair (Knoxville, Tennessee) 1984 Louisiana World Exposition (New Orleans) Expo '85 (Tsukuba, Japan) (via World's Fair Photos) Expo...
Four Beautiful Kodachrome Photos of New York City Storefronts

Four Beautiful Kodachrome Photos of New York City Storefronts

Auction Finds, Photography
In browsing through the Kodachrome prints on one of my favorite auction sites recently, I came upon these four gorgeous shots taken in New York City between 1949 and 1952. They feature four different storefronts and some of the sweetest Art Deco signage you will see this week. Click on any photo for the full-size version, and enjoy! Just look at those signs. Something about Art Deco makes even an otherwise drab storefront look slightly glamorous, doesn't it? The Golds and pharmacy stores must have looked fantastic on a dark New York City evening.
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 35: New York Horsecar Scene, 1910s-1920s

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 35: New York Horsecar Scene, 1910s-1920s

Vintage Photo Wednesday
I'll admit that this one has me a bit puzzled. What I can gather is that this is a shot of a horsecar in front of a building owned by the Hartford and New York Transportation Company. The company operated steamboats, barges, skiffs, tugboats, and other water craft and carried passengers between New York and Connecticut -- making frequent stops along the Connecticut River. In 1906 the company was taken over by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. All this is to say that I can't really nail down a date for this very nice photo. Click for the full-size version. The main clue for dating offered here is the horsecar in the foreground of the photo. Horsecars -- which differed slightly from horse-drawn trolleys -- were pretty much phased out of New York City by 1917 or so, w
Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Ephemera, Featured Posts
Getting to a World's Fair is definitely one of the items on my bucket list. But until I can attend one in person, I guess the next best thing will have to be to look at some vintage World's Fair postcards. The selection I present here spans every officially sanctioned and recognized fair and exposition from the first half of the 20th century. Due to the outbreak of World War II, there were no fairs held between 1941 and 1957. The next part of this overview (to be published later) will pick up with Expo 58 and run through Expo '98. Exposition Universelle (Paris, 1900) (via) Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo, 1901) Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis, 1904) (via Brenda) Liège International (Belgium, 1905) (via alanp_photo) Milan International (1906) Irish International