Tag: Whatever Happened To

Sports Graveyard: Indianapolis Capitols

Sports Graveyard: Indianapolis Capitols

Football Friday, Sports
I ran across this interesting pin while looking for old sports memorabilia, and was immediately intrigued. The only football team I ever thought called Indianapolis home is the Colts. So who were the Indianapolis Caps? Turns out the Caps -- actually the Indianapolis Capitols -- were a member of the short-lived Continental Football League. The CFL began play in 1965, five seasons after the American Football League, and folded after the 1969 season. The Caps joined the league in 1966 as the Montreal Beavers before moving to Indiana two years later. In their first year in Indianapolis, the Caps won the Central Division with an 8-4 record. They repeated that record in the league's final season, but managed to also win the last-ever CFL championship by beating the San Antonio Toros. ...
Whatever happened to… Crazy Eddie and Bugle Boy?

Whatever happened to… Crazy Eddie and Bugle Boy?

History
Who: Crazy Eddie When: 1971 - 1989 What: Crazy Eddie, one of the most famous brands in the New York Tri-State area, started in 1971 with one location in Brooklyn.  It was run by Eddie Antar, whose high-pressure sales techniques and accounting creativity turned that one store into a regional chain covering four states and 43 locations, and with more than $300 million in sales.  The chain specialized in discount electronics, but later expanded into music sales.  But more than their prices or goods Crazy Eddie was known for their advertising, which featured a hyper pitchman named Jerry Carroll.  Carroll's frenetic, absurdly comic delivery was so effective many people assumed he was Crazy Eddie. What happened: Turns out the secret to Antar's success was simple - he was a total crook
Whatever Happened to… Eastern Airlines and the World Hockey Association?

Whatever Happened to… Eastern Airlines and the World Hockey Association?

History
For some reason I've always found it more interesting to see why things like businesses fail than to read about success stories.  It's not even that I take any glee in their failure, so maybe it's an underdog thing?  Anyway, in the first entry of yet another series I'll likely abandon at some point, we will take a brief look at some of the more prominent businesses/entities to disappear from existence.  Up first is one that was the premiere example of its industry at one point, and one that was probably doomed from the start. Who: Eastern Airlines When: 1926 - 1991 What: Begun as a mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service in the 1920s, Eastern grew to become a dominant force in commercial aviation by the 1950s.  Its first CEO was famed World War I Flying Ace Eddie Rickenbacker