Tag: World War II

Fall TV Preview Madness! (CBS, 1966)

Fall TV Preview Madness! (CBS, 1966)

TV & Radio
In Fall TV Preview Madness, I present a network television schedule preview special from the distant past. We see the good, bad, and ugly for a network's entire upcoming fall slate. I’m counting down the days until the Fall 2012 television season gets underway the only way I know how — by bringing you network promos for TV seasons long gone. Today’s preview is for CBS’s 1966 Fall TV season. Your host for this preview is Garry Moore, a long-time fixture on The Eye. You'll see stars this fall on CBS! (* denotes new series.) Sunday 7pm -- Lassie (1954 - 1971) 7:30pm* -- It's About Time (Starring Frank Aletta, Jack Mullaney, and Imogene Coca; ended after 26 episodes.) 8pm -- The Ed Sullivan Show (1948 - 1971) 9pm* -- The Garry Moore Show (Ended after 19 episodes.) 10pm
Saturday Serials: “Lured by Radium” (Batman 1943, Chapter 8)

Saturday Serials: “Lured by Radium” (Batman 1943, Chapter 8)

Movies
According to my calculations we've now passed the midway point on our journey through 1943's Batman serial. It's been a wild ride so far, hasn't it? Well, no, it hasn't really. But it has been a fascinating glimpse into a part of Batman history many fans don't even know about. So anyway, chapter 8 is here and it's called "Lured by Radium." If you've been watching up until now you know that radium is a key element in Dr. Daka's quest to pave the way for a Japanese conquest of America in World War II. But every time he gets close, the Caped Crusader gets in his way once again. Well that and colossal ineptitude. How else to explain the wise decision to send men wearing nothing but suits into a mine to gather a radioactive element? For the answer to this, and some other excellent decis...
Images of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy — June 6, 1944

Images of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy — June 6, 1944

History, Photography
The Normandy landings, codenamed Operation Neptune, were the landing operations of the Allied invasion of Normandy, in Operation Overlord, during World War II. The landings commenced on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 (D-Day), beginning at 6:30 am British Double Summer Time (GMT+2). In planning, D-Day was the term used for the day of actual landing, which was dependent on final approval.
Photo Gallery: Memorial Day Army Parade, Washington, D.C., May 1942

Photo Gallery: Memorial Day Army Parade, Washington, D.C., May 1942

Capsules, History
Here are some cool images taken during a Memorial Day parade in Washington, D.C., circa May 1942. As this was the first Memorial Day since the United States military officially entered World War II it likely took on extra significance. I'm no military expert so I can't identify any of the units in these photos. I'm assuming they're reserve units, but I could be wrong. There's a few shots in this gallery of what was referred to at the time as a Colored unit. Photography credit goes to Thomas McAvoy for Life magazine. (Click on the thumbnail for a larger version.)
Saturday Serials: “The Electrical Brain” (Batman, 1943)

Saturday Serials: “The Electrical Brain” (Batman, 1943)

Movies
Our first foray into the world of cinema serials begins with... The Bat. As we inch ever closer to the release of Christopher Nolan's third and final Batman movie, The Dark Knight Rises, it's worthwhile to take a look at where it all began. No, not with Tim Burton's movie, and not even with the Adam West camp-fest. We start simply with Batman, the original Columbia Pictures serial. This film, released in 15 chapters, marks the big screen debut of Bob Kane's legendary creation and was released in July 1943 -- just over four years after Batman sprang to life in Detective Comics #27. For those with even a superficial knowledge of Batman, much of the first chapter ("The Electrical Brain") will seem familiar. The dynamic duo of Batman (Lewis Wilson) and Robin (Douglas Croft) display their...
Fighting Yank Cares Not for Your Fondue Party, Japan!

Fighting Yank Cares Not for Your Fondue Party, Japan!

Ephemera
I love this Golden Age comic book cover from Nedor's Startling Comics #34 (July 1945), in which the Fighting Yank busts up a POW/fondue party in some random basement. Take that, Tojo, you cheese loving imperialist! I'm no expert in World War II uniforms, but I'm not sure the armband with the Japanese flag was standard issue. But I guess you had to know which side he was fighting for, just in case the horrible teeth and sinister sub-human facial appearance wasn't a tipoff. I also like how Fighting Yank looks all serious and businesslike. He takes no pleasure in cold-cocking Japs, it's just his job. (How he hasn't been appropriated as a symbol of the Tea Party yet is beyond me.) Capt. Bomber Jacket, on the other hand, has the serene, blank expression of someone who is clearly under
The 1930s and 1940s in Living Color, Part 3

The 1930s and 1940s in Living Color, Part 3

History, Photography
It's been just over a year since the last installment of cool color photographs from the Library of Congress's Flickr page, so let's get a gander at some more! These photos were all taken between 1939 and 1944 by the United States Farm Security Administration (FSA) and later the Office of War Information (OWI).  Just click on a photo to see a larger version. (Part 1 can be seen here, Part 2 is here.) Not only is this a cool photo for its historical value, it's just a skillfully executed shot all around. The Boeing B-17 was widely used in bombing raids over Germany in World War II and became known as the "Flying Fortress." (Alfred T. Palmer, photographer) *** I find it interesting that the trucks are much more colorful than the cars. I would've figured all that drab
Will Barack Obama Be “Hell-Bent for Election” in 2012?

Will Barack Obama Be “Hell-Bent for Election” in 2012?

Movies
It's not even 2012 yet and this is turning out to be one of the saddest and most lackluster presidential campaign seasons in recent memory. Barring a societal or economic meltdown of Mayan Prophecy proportions (and no, the so-called Great Recession doesn't quite reach that level), I don't see how Barack Obama can lose. That's not to say that he's been kicking ass for the last three-or-so-years. Aside from taking out bin Laden, perhaps Obama's most memorable accomplishment this term has been that he kept McCain and Palin out of the White House. And for me at least, that still counts for something. I just wonder if he'll have much ammo to use when a Republican candidate finally emerges from the farcical battle royale that has been the GOP Octagon, which is down another competitor now that