Thursday, May 28
Shadow

Day: August 24, 2007

Lay off the prognosticating, Rog.

Lay off the prognosticating, Rog.

Movies
Here's a quote from Roger Ebert's review of the 1986 classic Lucas, co-starring a budding talent by the name of Corey Haim: Lucas is played by Corey Haim, who was Sally Field's son in "Murphy's Romance," and he does not give one of those cute little boy performances that get on your nerves. He creates one of the most three-dimensional, complicated, interesting characters of any age in any recent movie. If he can continue to act this well, he will never become a half-forgotten child star, but will continue to grow into an important actor. He is that good." Oops. (props to jefitoblog for bringing this Nostradamus-esque tidbit to light)
When is a band/artist past their sell-by date?

When is a band/artist past their sell-by date?

Music
Anyone who has seen a performance by a band that's been around for at least 10 years or so has witnessed the following - one of the members says something along the lines of "this next one is off our new album" and half the audience either sits down or heads for the beer lines. Once in awhile, the crowd will become openly hostile and start booing any new material (this happened to Genesis during their Duke tour). So when does this transformation take place? At what point in a band's career do fans stop being receptive to new stuff? Is there anything an artist can do to prevent this? I've seen Rush a ton of times over the last 17 years and they seem to do a pretty good job of it, mostly because they consistently feature new material in their set lists. But during the last show I saw...