Month: September 2012

Football Friday: Life Magazine’s Look at the NFL of 1960

Football Friday: Life Magazine’s Look at the NFL of 1960

Football Friday, Sports
This is one of the cooler sports photo galleries I've put together for you. This is a combination of published and unpublished images for a Life magazine article on the NFL and the ascent of pro football as a spectator sport. It ran in their December 5, 1960 issue and was called "Fans Go Ga-Ga Over Pro Football." The pictures in this gallery were taken by George Silk during the 1960 NFL season and seem to come from X main sources -- four New York Giants home games (against the Philadelphia Eagles, Pittsburgh Steelers, St. Louis Cardinals, and Washington Redskins), a Giants film session, and a game between the Chicago Bears and Baltimore Colts (which I believe to be a home game for the Colts). Included here is a photo of Eagles linebacker creaming the Giants' Frank Gifford. I don'...
Car Capsule: Photos of the 1955 Ford and Mercury Lineup

Car Capsule: Photos of the 1955 Ford and Mercury Lineup

Capsules, Featured Posts
Some time in 1954, Life magazine photographer Yale Joel ventured to an unknown destination. His assignment was to photograph a group of brand new cars -- 1955 Ford and Mercury models, to be precise. I don't know how many of these pictures ended up in the magazine, as I've been unable to find any associated article in the Google Books archive, but some of these are real stunners. I wasn't sure at first if these were actually 1954 models, but the dead giveaway was the distinctive look of the '55 Ford Fairlane. That stainless steel Fairlane stripe on the side was what tipped me off, as the Fairlane debuted in model year 1955 (replacing the Crestline). Also present -- as far as I can tell -- are the Mercury Montclair and Monterey, as well as a Ford station wagon. Owing to the fact th...
Just a Gentle Reminder (aka Shameless Plug)

Just a Gentle Reminder (aka Shameless Plug)

Blogstuff
For those who haven't yet beheld the wonder that is the official Facebook page of the Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, there's still time to head over and click that magical Like button. Otherwise, there's no telling what could happen. So won't you please think of all the sidekicks out there, click on this link (or on the Facebook icon in the upper right), and then hit that Like button? I promise it'll be worth your while, as there's all sorts of cool stuff to see there that I don't share here.
Album Cover of the Week: Jackie Gleason, Music for Lovers Only

Album Cover of the Week: Jackie Gleason, Music for Lovers Only

Album Cover of the Week, Music
Last month I reviewed a new CD reissue of Jackie Gleason's Music for Lovers Only album at Popdose. I meant to feature the album cover as part of this series but got distracted by something bright and shiny. So let's look at it now! Beautiful, ain't she? While many of Gleason's albums of "mood music" from the '50s and '60s tried to recreate the same feel, I think this is still the best of the bunch. Put another way, there is absolutely no doubt as to what the music on this record will sound like, even if you were totally unfamiliar with Gleason's style of orchestral pop.
Football Friday: What Steve Sabol Meant to Me

Football Friday: What Steve Sabol Meant to Me

Football Friday, Sports
One of the few things about the nearly interminable one or two-week buildup between the NFC/AFC championship games and the Super Bowl that I looked forward to was tuning into ESPN and watching hours upon hours of NFL Films' Super Bowl highlight packages. In some ways, watching those 30-minute capsules -- replete with their sweeping orchestral scores and booming narration by John Facenda -- was more rewarding than the games themselves. Through the magic of eBay and torrent sites, I've had the opportunity to watch Super Bowls from the 1970s and early '80s, that I wasn't around to see or was too young to remember. In almost all cases, watching those contests was almost a letdown after memorizing practically every line and every beat from the NFL Films version. Take, for example, ...
Here’s a Pair of Bizarre, Racist Catalog Pages from Old Sears Catalogs

Here’s a Pair of Bizarre, Racist Catalog Pages from Old Sears Catalogs

Ephemera
I wasn't planning on rolling out any of my Halloween-related posts until October, but this was so bizarre I just had to share it now. In searching old Sears catalogs for Halloween costumes -- as is my wont -- I came across these insane items. Let me just present them, and then we can chat. The first is a "Negro Makeup Outfit" from the Fall 1912 catalog: And up next is a group of costumes from the Fall 1920 catalog. It has classic Negro masks like Sporty Mose (sorry, collar and tie not included), Old Uncle Joe, and Aunt Dinah (a Negress outfit not complete without this mask!). Oh, and if you really want to go hog wild you can get one of the full body suits -- there’s the Ridiculous Yellow Kid, the Japanese Lady, and the Negro Minstrel Suit (suitable for hometown shows, no less).
Vintage Photo Wednesday: Detroit, 1927

Vintage Photo Wednesday: Detroit, 1927

Vintage Photo Wednesday
This is a news service wire photo of Randolph Street looking west in Detroit, Michigan. It's dated July 9, 1927. I would love to travel back in time and ride one of those trolley cars. Related articles Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 7 - Early 20th Century Cars Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 - Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s Vintage Photo Wednesday: Labor Day Parades and Celebrations of the Past Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 9 - Republican National Conventions Detroit resurgent? VentureBeat is coming to the Motor City in September
Vintage Ephemera: Fun and Nonsense by Willard Bonte (1904)

Vintage Ephemera: Fun and Nonsense by Willard Bonte (1904)

Books, Ephemera, Featured Posts
I've always been a lover of anthropomorphic art, so when I found this old children's book from 1904 on the internet I was pretty jazzed. It's called Fun and Nonsense, and was written by Willard Bonte. I know nothing of Mr. Bonte, and Wikipedia offers no help, but his contribution to the world of illustrated children's literature is spectacular indeed. Clicking on most of the images will open larger versions. Enjoy! (Images obtained from the International Children's Digital Library.)