Tag: 1900s

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 40: Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in Philadelphia, 1908

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 40: Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in Philadelphia, 1908

Vintage Photo Wednesday
I'm sure this must have been an odd sight to Philadelphians back in the day. It's a posed group photo of famed soldier and showman William F. Cody with the members of his "Buffalo Bill's Wild West" traveling show. Click for the full-size version. That's Buffalo Bill seated roughly in the middle of the picture, behind a group of Native American children. Cody started his first Wild West show in 1883, and he toured the world with it until it went bankrupt in 1913. Many people hold the belief that when Cody died in 1917 at the age of 70, it marked the end of the Wild West in America. The rather imposing building behind the group is the famed Wanamaker's, the first department store in Philly and one of the first in the United States. You can see some interested onlookers peering thro...
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 22: Hudson Tunnel Station Newsies, 1909

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 22: Hudson Tunnel Station Newsies, 1909

Vintage Photo Wednesday
Starting this week I'm going to start featuring more vintage photographs from my home state of New Jersey -- the good, the bad, and the just plain neat. It's a great opportunity for me to both share and learn more about the Garden State, so save your mob/pollution jokes please. As with most of the other photos I've shared, I'm going to attempt to clean things up a bit. I'm no Shorpy but I do what I can. This week's image was taken by Lewis Wickes Hine, who shot countless numbers of pictures depicting child labor at the turn of the century and later. This photo shows a group of newsies hawking papers at the Hudson Tunnel Station in Jersey City in December 1909. From the Library of Congress page description: "Newsie selling at the Hudson Tunnel Station, Jersey City. Boy on left is Patr...
Time Capsule: Puck Magazine Thanksgiving Political Covers, 1894-1913

Time Capsule: Puck Magazine Thanksgiving Political Covers, 1894-1913

Capsules, Ephemera
Published from 1871 until 1918, Puck magazine was America's first successful humor magazine featuring cartoons and political satire. Their Thanksgiving covers, while not always political, usually were and are still fun to look at today even if the relevance has been lost to time. Their choice of makes sense when you know that they were based out of New York City. Tammany Hall, which we all heard about in history class but have since forgotten, figures prominently. Here's a selection of Puck's Thanksgiving covers from around the turn of the 20th century, courtesy the Library of Congress. That's prominent New York politician David B. Hall, who we'll see again in 1902. He lost the NY gubernatorial race in 1894 to Levi P. Morton. Tammany Hall was a frequent target for ...
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 17: Memories of Atlantic City

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 17: Memories of Atlantic City

Vintage Photo Wednesday
The cleanup from Hurricane Sandy has barely begun here in New Jersey. In fact, I'm writing this from somewhere other than my home due to a lack of power. I think it's safe to say that large parts of the state -- the Jersey Shore especially -- will never be the same. So for this edition of Vintage Photo Wednesday, let's remember one place in particular: Atlantic City.
Vintage Ephemera: Fun and Nonsense by Willard Bonte (1904)

Vintage Ephemera: Fun and Nonsense by Willard Bonte (1904)

Books, Ephemera, Featured Posts
I've always been a lover of anthropomorphic art, so when I found this old children's book from 1904 on the internet I was pretty jazzed. It's called Fun and Nonsense, and was written by Willard Bonte. I know nothing of Mr. Bonte, and Wikipedia offers no help, but his contribution to the world of illustrated children's literature is spectacular indeed. Clicking on most of the images will open larger versions. Enjoy! (Images obtained from the International Children's Digital Library.)
Vintage College Football Sheet Music (1890s – 1930s)

Vintage College Football Sheet Music (1890s – 1930s)

Football Friday, Sports
While most of my Football Friday posts focus on the National Football League, I don't want to forget the college game. After all, that's where American football got its start -- and where it was most popular up until about the mid 20th century. So for something a little different, I've pulled together a gallery of vintage college football sheet music covers, most of which feature timeless school fight songs. Why sheet music, you ask? Honestly, I have no idea. But you know I love old ephemera, so that's all the reason I need really. "The Victors" is the fight song of the University of Michigan. "On Iowa" is one of three fight songs currently used by the University of Iowa Hawkeye Marching Band, along with "Iowa Fight Song" and "Roll Along Iowa." ...
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 7 — Early 20th Century Cars

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 7 — Early 20th Century Cars

Vintage Photo Wednesday
From Wikipedia: The Haynes Automobile Company was a United States automobile manufacturing company, which produced automobiles in Kokomo, Indiana, from 1905 to 1924. The company was related to the Haynes-Apperson company, which produced automobiles from 1896-1905. Co-founder Elwood Haynes changed the name of the company after fellow co-founders Elmer and Edgar Apperson left to form the Apperson Automobile Company. From Wikipedia: The Stanley Motor Carriage Company was an American manufacturer of steam-engine vehicles; it operated from 1902 to 1924. The cars made by the company were colloquially called Stanley Steamers, although several different models were produced. The 8-96 is also known as the Buick Victoria. From Wikipedia: Chalmers Motor Car Company...
Moments in Olympic Infamy: Anthropology Days

Moments in Olympic Infamy: Anthropology Days

History, Sports
The first handful of modern Olympic Games would probably look a little strange to fans these days. Things weren't nearly as slick or organized in the olden days, and never was this more evident than the 1904 St. Louis Games. The Third Olympiad was already hamstrung by the fact that many European athletes couldn’t or wouldn’t make the journey to St. Louis, so only 12 nations competed (as opposed to 24 in the 1900 Paris Games). This left the United States free to go apeshit, and they proceeded to win 239 medals; Germany was next with 13. In fact, St. Louis only got the Games in the first place because they threatened to stage their own sporting competition to upstage Chicago, the city that had originally won them. So St. Louis got the Olympics, but relegated them to a sideshow for the
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 — Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 — Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s

Featured Posts, Vintage Photo Wednesday
This is the first of what I hope will be a long-running feature on the site. Each Wednesday I'll post a handful of vintage photographs that strike my fancy. Some weeks there will be a theme, others not so much. If you have any subjects you'd like me to look for, or have photos you'd like to share, let me know! This week's collection is drawn from the Photochrom Print Collection on the Library of Congress website. From the site: The Photochrom Print Collection has almost 6,000 views of Europe and the Middle East and 500 views of North America. Published primarily from the 1890s to 1910s, these prints were created by the Photoglob Company in Zürich, Switzerland, and the Detroit Publishing Company in Michigan. The richly colored images look like photographs but are actually ink-based phot