Tag: 1970s

Bump with me — Classic network logo ID bumpers

Bump with me — Classic network logo ID bumpers

TV & Radio
I've forgotten about 95% of the TV shows I watched growing up, which is probably my brain's self-defense mechanism kicking in. But one thing I haven't forgotten is all those nifty little bumpers I was bombarded with multiple times a day. Some of them are iconic, some just quaint and cheesy. How many of these do you remember? (more…)
What the hell am I going to do with 20 pairs of leg warmers?

What the hell am I going to do with 20 pairs of leg warmers?

Rants
So I'm watching Saturday Night Fever last night with Mrs. Suit, and a thought occurred to me - what goes through a person's mind when they reach the point where popular fashion dictates that what they've been wearing for the last 6 months to two years is now hideously out of style and they have to ditch it? I know there were a ton of kids in the '70s who had those giant platform shoes like Bobby C (the one who fell off the bridge at the end). What did they say when they not only realized that those shoes were no longer cool, but that they spent the last few years looking like morons for wearing them? Is there any remorse in a situation like this, or do they just shrug their shoulders and move on? Or do they eagerly embrace the next garish fashion trend to emerge, like an alcoholic ...
Rush Album Countdown: #8 – #5

Rush Album Countdown: #8 – #5

Music
If you've been paying attention to the Rush album countdown thus far, you'll notice that with one exception, the remaining albums were released between 1976-1984, a period most fans consider the Golden Age of Rush (although some would stop at about '81 or '82). This is typical of many bands, I think. After finding their way (no pun intended) for a few albums, great bands tend to hit their stride by no later than the 3rd or 4th release. Then it's smooth sailing for awhile. Most bands experience a decline after some time, and it's just a matter of how much that decline is. I think Rush is in a select group that can claim a very soft landing, with some occasional spots of greatness in later years. But I digress... Here's the rundown of things so far: Part 1 (#17 – #15) — Rush, Hold Your
Rush Album Countdown: #11 – #9

Rush Album Countdown: #11 – #9

Music
I suppose I better get cracking on the rest of this countdown if I'm going to make it in time for the May 1 release of Snakes & Arrows. Today we crack the Top 10, which I guess is a pretty big deal huh? But before we get there let's recap the results thus far: Part 1 (#17 - #15) -- Rush, Hold Your Fire, Roll the Bones Part 2 (#14 - #12) --  Test for Echo, Vapor Trails, Fly by Night Everything on the list so far represents albums that are all very good but uneven. To put it another way, even a mediocre Rush album is better than most other bands' stuff. With that in mind, let us push onward! #11 - Caress of Steel (1975) Caress of Steel is where Rush really started to push the limits of their musical abilities. While the results are not consistently great, this is a cruc
Rush Album Countdown: #14 – #12

Rush Album Countdown: #14 – #12

Music
Now that you've had a week to digest the first installment of my countdown of the greatest-ever Rush albums, which shook the World Wide Interweb to its very core, it's time to continue! But first, a quick recap: Part 1 (#17 - #15) -- Rush, Hold Your Fire, Roll the Bones All caught up? Good. #14 - Test for Echo (1996) I guess when you get down to it, '90s Rush just doesn't do it for me (with one exception). Right around the time of Test for Echo's release, Neil Peart had implemented a change in drumming style that Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson claimed brought a freshness to their musical approach. I don't hear it. A lot of this record just sounds plodding to me, which is really hurts otherwise good songs like "Driven," "Limbo," and "Time and Motion." One exception to this is "T
Rush Album Countdown: #17 – #15

Rush Album Countdown: #17 – #15

Music
In anticipation of the May 1 release of Rush's 18th full-length studio album, Snakes & Arrows, I'll be reviewing the first 17 in order of greatness. I'm skipping compilations and live albums, mainly because none of Rush's compilations or live albums are all that essential. And I'm lazy. That can't be stressed enough. I originally wanted to dedicate a post to each album, but I think that would rightly be seen as a transparent attempt to drag this thing out needlessly. So I'll start with 3 at a time, and we'll see how that goes. #17 - Rush (1974) No surprise here. While by no means a bad album, Rush represents a group that obviously hadn't found their own style yet. Most reviews of this album point out how influenced it is by Led Zeppelin and Cream. Honestly I can't hear the...
Deep Cuts: Queen

Deep Cuts: Queen

Music
Here's the first in a series of entries dedicated to exploring songs from my favorite groups that don't get a lot of attention. These represent the ten best songs (in no special order) from an act's catalog that were never released as singles, don't get radio play, and are typically appreciated only by hardcore fans. Up first is Queen, for no other reason than they showed up on my iPod today. "In the Lap of the Gods" (Sheer Heart Attack, 1974) - What makes this song great is the completely over-the-top opening and some of Queen's sweetest vocal harmonies ever. Listen to the super-high part - that's drummer Roger Taylor, a key element of the band's vocal presentation. "Football Fight" (Flash Gordon, 1980) - Although not fully fleshed out, this is still a gem of a tune. It features...
1974 – It was a very good year (for music)

1974 – It was a very good year (for music)

Music
According a recent piece on cnn.com, 1974 was a really bad year for music. Like, really bad. As some examples, the author cites the following examples of musical craptasticity: Terry Jacks' "Seasons in the Sun," Cher's "Dark Lady," Ray Stevens' "The Streak," Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods' "Billy, Don't Be a Hero," John Denver's "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" and "Annie's Song," Paper Lace's "The Night Chicago Died," Paul Anka's "(You're) Having My Baby," Olivia Newton-John's "I Honestly Love You" and Carl Douglas' "Kung Fu Fighting." Looking at that list, I would be inclined to agree with the author's assertion that 1974 was a dry, rocky place where the seeds of quality could find no purchase. But the problem with the article is this - there was PLENTY of great music being produced in 19...