Tag: 1990s

Football Friday — The World League of American Football

Football Friday — The World League of American Football

Football Friday, Sports
It's instructive to remember from time to time that not everything the National Football League touches turns to gold. Case in point -- the World League of American Football. It was formed, with backing from the NFL, fewer than five years after the collapse of the rival USFL. The WLAF was the NFL's first organized attempt to spread the game beyond American shores, and as such it featured four franchises outside the United States (London, Barcelona, Frankfurt, and Montreal). It also served as a developmental league of sorts for the NFL, a concept that would be carried over into the WLAF's successor league. The first WLAF franchise was awarded to Orlando, which dubbed themselves the Thunder and lives on in football fans' memories as the owners of one of the ugliest uniforms in spor
Why The Hell Should I Like… A Tribe Called Quest?

Why The Hell Should I Like… A Tribe Called Quest?

Music
“Why the hell should I like… ?” is an experiment of sorts between Popblerd and The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. What we’re going to attempt to do is to pick 10 songs from our favorite artists — one for which the other has professed dislike or disinterest — and show them why they’re wrong (or why they should be interested.) A Tribe Called Quest is a pretty serious contender for the best rap group of all time. Formed in the late '80s by childhood friends Jonathan Davis (Q-Tip) and Malik Taylor (Phife Dawg), the group recruited DJ Ali Shaheed Muhammad and, joined by on-again off-again member Jarobi White, Tribe went on to become one of the most critically and commercially successful "legitimate" hip hop acts of the early '90s. The Low End Theory (1991) and Midnight Marauders (1993) ar
Cross-pollination: Beyond the Wonder (Right Said Fred) on Popdose

Cross-pollination: Beyond the Wonder (Right Said Fred) on Popdose

Blogstuff
It feels like it's been ages since my last entry in the Beyond the Wonder series, which covered Bertie "Key Largo" Higgins' debut LP. In fact, I had a piece for Right Said Fred's 1992 debut album -- Up -- in draft status but kept putting it off forever. Dance pop isn't really my thing so I didn't want to judge the record too prematurely. I'm glad I waited, as it turns out it was better than I thought on first listen. Well, parts of it were anyway. It seems that Up is a strange hybrid of canned, forgettable dance pop (minus the immortal "I'm Too Sexy" of course) and surprisingly decent mainstream pop. But you can read all about that on Popdose now. In the meantime, let's get sexy! Related articles Cross-pollination: My favorite instrumentals (on Popdose) (grayflannelsuit.net) ...
10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Kiss

10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Kiss

Featured Posts, Music
It's been nearly 40 years since Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley, Ace Frehley, and Peter Criss put greasepaint on their faces and took the stage as Kiss for the first time. Since then they've amassed 24 gold albums in the United States, took the makeup off, got a bunch of new members, put the makeup back on, and toured seemingly in perpetuity. In those four decades a lot of facts, rumors, and myths about Kiss have circulated. Of course the diehard members of the Kiss Army usually know what's what, but for everyone else, here are ten things you probably didn't know about Kiss. 10. Katey Sagal was a backup singer on Gene Simmons' 1978 solo album. Before she gained fame with American television audiences for her portrayals of Peg Bundy (Married... with Children) and later Leela (Fu...
30 for 30 — Our Favorite MTV Music Videos of All-Time

30 for 30 — Our Favorite MTV Music Videos of All-Time

Featured Posts, Music, TV & Radio
It seems like forever since watching videos on MTV was a regular part of our lives, but once upon a time it was. We could go on and on about how the station -- which turns 30 on August 1 -- turned to crap years ago for one reason or another, or about how the "M" in MTV seems to stand for Mook now, but let's not go there. Let's make this post a happy remembrance, one in which we celebrate what was rather than lament what isn't. So in that spirit of celebration, here is a list of our 30 favorite music videos of the MTV era (which kicked off on August 1, 1981). Not the best videos, necessarily, but the ones that had the most impact on us. Oh, and for you ranking junkies -- sorry, this is strictly in alphabetical order. 1. Daft Punk, "Around the World" In college we had a primitiv...
Why the Hell Should I Like… post-‘Thriller’ Michael Jackson?

Why the Hell Should I Like… post-‘Thriller’ Michael Jackson?

Music
“Why the hell should I like… ?” is an experiment of sorts between Popblerd and The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. What we’re going to attempt to do is to pick 10 songs from our favorite artists — one for which the other has professed dislike or disinterest — and show them why they’re wrong. On June 25th, 2009, the world lost one of the greatest entertainers of all time -- Michael Jackson. Although recent history had not been kind to Michael, after his passing it seemed like a light switch went on in the collective mind of the American public and they began to view him with respect again. Because let's face it, despite his obvious issues, the man was a one-of-a-kind talent. A fantastic singer, a great dancer, a solid songwriter and producer, and, if you look over the current pop mu
Deep Cuts: Judas Priest

Deep Cuts: Judas Priest

Music
You don't even have to be a heavy metal fan to know who Judas Priest is. Over the past several decades, they've cemented their status as metal legends time and time again. This year marks the kickoff of the band's Epitaph World Tour, stated to be the last Judas Priest world tour ever. Who knows if that's really true (KISS, anyone?), but now seems as good a time as any to examine the band's lengthy discography and pick out a few hidden treasures. 1. "Burnin' Up" (Killing Machine/Hell Bent for Leather, 1978) -- By the late '70s the Priest had largely moved on from more complex song structures and the occasional foray into metal balladry. Few songs from this period typify the band's more streamlined approach than "Burnin' Up," a musically muscular and lyrically charged slice of metal. ...
Album cover of the week: The Outer Limits

Album cover of the week: The Outer Limits

Album Cover of the Week, Music
This week we step into the world of progressive metal with an entry from Canada's own Voivod -- one of the truly excellent metal bands to emerge in the 1980s, and one that never achieved the crossover success they deserved to in the United States. From 1993, it's The Outer Limits. OK, maybe not so impressive is it? But the really cool thing about this cover is that when the album was initially released it came packaged with 3D glasses, in order to properly look at the front cover and booklet images. There is another issue of the album that ditches the 3D effect, and it's pretty neat too. The credits for The Outer Limits artwork are: Art direction: Vartan Design: Ron Larson Illustrations: Michael Langevin
Game Off! — A brief history of NFL labor strife

Game Off! — A brief history of NFL labor strife

Sports
As football fans across the country sweat out the days leading up to the March 3 expiration of the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between the NFL and the NFL Players Association, it's worth pointing out that work stoppages are nothing new for the league. In fact they've occurred multiple times in its long history. Here's a brief primer on the history of National Football League work stoppages. 1960s — Players weak, owners strong Although the NFL/AFL merger was fait accompli by 1968, the players in the two leagues continued to be represented by separate associations. This left the NFLPA in a position of weakness when presenting demands related to pensions and paychecks, among other items, and they voted on July 3, 1968 to strike. In response the league essentially said, "You can't