Tag: Abraham Lincoln

Uh Oh SpaghettiOs, Pearl Harbor Day Edition

Uh Oh SpaghettiOs, Pearl Harbor Day Edition

Advertising, Funny Stuff
You'd think that by now companies would have learned how to effectively manage their social media presence. You'd be wrong. The latest corporate gaffe comes courtesy everybody's favorite canned, sauce-drenched, pasta-like product, SpaghettiOs. OK, so let's talk about this for a second. While I'm all for remembering the Pearl Harbor attack of December 7, 1941, the jovial nature of this image doesn't really fit the solemn tone of the day. Really, SpaghettiOs, if you can't be bothered to alter your mascot so it doesn't have its tongue sticking out and a goofy smile, maybe just stick with a text message? Anyway, here's a few more tragedies that we might expect SpaghettiOs to commemorate in the future. First is the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln: And for a more cont...
Honda’s Presidents Day Commercial Is My New Jam

Honda’s Presidents Day Commercial Is My New Jam

Advertising
Up until recently, every Presidents Day sale commercial I had seen was either stupid, disrespectful or both. And then I caught this Executive Office Slow Jam from Honda. Oh yes, that is glorious. And inspired. "Who's your founding father?" "Talkin' 'bout the red, white, and bluetooth." I need to watch this again. George Washington and Abraham Lincoln have never seemed so damn soulful.
I don’t need your Civil War…

I don’t need your Civil War…

History
Even if you're not a history freak like I am, you should take some time to acknowledge that today is a pretty big anniversary. Exactly 150 years ago today -- April 12, 1865 for the math-challenged -- that the American Civil War began when forces from the Confederate States of America (CSA) launched an attack on the Federal outpost of Fort Sumter in South Carolina. 34 hours after the battle began Union forces, under the command of Major Robert Anderson, surrendered to Brigadier General P.G.T. Beauregard's Confederates. Neither side suffered any casualties during the battle, although two Union officers died after a gun explosion during the April 14 surrender ceremony. Following the Union defeat President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteer soldiers for 90 days, as the scale of the Sout...
What’s so funny about insurance?

What’s so funny about insurance?

Advertising
It used to be that insurance commercials were created to convey one thing above all else — a feeling of total security and warm fuzziness that Company X was going to be there for you after your house blew up or your car got flattened by a rampaging elephant. Ad campaigns from agencies like Nationwide, State Farm, and Allstate were full of sensible people making sensible decisions. The slogans drove this theme home even more succinctly: Nationwide was on your side, you were in good hands with Allstate, and so on. But somewhere along the way things changed and insurance companies decided to start getting a bit cutesy with their ads. The Aflac Duck (voiced by the unlikely pitchman Gilbert Gottfried) debuted nationally in 1999, while local companies such as Chicago-based Eagle Insuranc
America the Brave: A Selection of Veterans Day Images

America the Brave: A Selection of Veterans Day Images

History
This post was originally published on Veterans Day 2008, and has proven to be one of my more popular entries.  So I'm bringing it back as my small tribute for this year. Originally known as Armistice Day, the first Veterans Day was celebrated on November 11, 1938 -- the 20th anniversary of the effective end of World War I.  Starting in 1954 the scope of the holiday was expanded to commemorate all those who had fought and served for the United States. I don't have any stirring essays in me, so my small tribute to our armed forces is this collection of images portraying the history of major American military conflict.  Thank you all for your service! American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) The Battle of Trenton (December 26, 1776) was a turning point in the American Revo
Interesting stuff I now know thanks to Wikipedia (Vol. 3)

Interesting stuff I now know thanks to Wikipedia (Vol. 3)

Listcruft
As with the first two entries, the premise of this is simple.  I just used the Random Article link on Wikipedia and saw if anything good came up.  (a lot of it is quite useless) The town of Britton, Michigan is named after storekeeper John Britton, who in 1888 paid $500 to rename the town of Balch after himself. There is a variant of Scrabble called Clabbers, whose rules are the same except for one: The letters used must form anagrams of acceptable words. The Grammy Award for Best Gospel Vocal Performance, Female was only given out from 1984 through 1990.  Amy Grant won it four times. The 1968 Cannes Film Festival ended early, without awarding any prizes, due to a French general strike in May. I can't believe I didn't know this, but Adolf Hitler had a sister, Paula Hitler.  She
Queer Eye for the Dead Guy

Queer Eye for the Dead Guy

Funny Stuff
In an effort to make the drab five-dollar bill more appealing (and to combat counterfeiters I suppose), it seems poor ol' Abe Lincoln has been given the metrosexual makeover he so desperately needed. "Ooooh, look at you Mr. Stone Face! 'Grrrr, I'm the president and I freed the slaves! Hey, who are you and how did you get in my private booth?!' Kidding! So listen, just because you've been dead for almost 150 years doesn't mean you can't look fab-u-lous! Hmmm, let's see here. Any chance of loosening up that collar? Maybe a polo shirt? No? Oh well. You know, green really isn't 'in' anymore, but I guess we can't buck tradition too much. So let's have some fun, and add some...purple! Oh, that's hot. While we're at it, any chance of getting some product in that hair? It's just not workin...