Tag: Alex Lifeson

Listening Booth — Rush at Stadhalle, Offenbach, Germany (May 28, 1979)

Listening Booth — Rush at Stadhalle, Offenbach, Germany (May 28, 1979)

Listening Booth, Music
I can't believe I didn't think of this sooner, but it's high time I posted a Rush show on this site for the first time. After all, they finally made it into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it only seems right. And so inspired by my friends at Addicted to Vinyl sharing an excellent concert from the band's first album tour, I'm sharing one of favorites. This concert was recorded at the Stadhalle in Offenbach, West Germany on May 28, 1979 -- the second-to-last date on the Hemispheres tour. It goes by several names, but the copy I have is called Black Forest. It's a fantastic soundboard recording and the band is, as usual, on fire. Of note is that the entire "Hemispheres" suite is played, as is all of  "2112." Some of the transitions are rather abrupt, but otherwise this is an extreme
In Concert: Rush at the Prudential Center, 10/20/12

In Concert: Rush at the Prudential Center, 10/20/12

Music
I'll admit that at this point in my life as a Rush fan, I'm rather spoiled. I've been going to Rush concerts since they came to Madison Square Garden in December 1991 on the Roll the Bones tour, and I've seen them on every album tour since (as well as the 30th anniversary tour). And the thing is, even a mediocre Rush show is better than most bands on their best night. So for me, the sheer visceral thrill of seeing Geddy, Alex, and Neil live isn't what it used to be. But after sitting out the last few tours, I decided to see the band for the first time since the Snakes & Arrows tour in July 2007. I did so for two reasons -- I caught a peek at some of their set lists from the tour, and I was impressed with the first several tracks I heard from the Clockwork Angels album. But before I ...
“Headlong Flight” — NEW RUSH SONG!

“Headlong Flight” — NEW RUSH SONG!

Music
Let's just get down to it, people. "Headlong Flight" is the first official track released from the upcoming Rush album Clockwork Angels. And yea, verily, it rocketh quite hard. Behold! "Headlong Flight" via Rolling Stone. Love the fact that Rush brought back Nick Raskulinecz to co-produce, as he did a bang up job on Snakes & Arrows. Geddy, Neil, and Alex all sound as energetic as they have in at least 20 years. Looks like I need to set aside some money to see this tour.
Does it matter if Rush never makes it into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?

Does it matter if Rush never makes it into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?

Music
I've been a Rush fan for, oh, just over 20 years I suppose. It's not exactly the most exclusive club in the world, but it's not like being a fan of the Beatles or Bruce Springsteen either. In most circles, when you tell people you're a Rush fan, they give you a sideways look as if to say, "Oh, that's nice. And do you still play Dungeons and Dragons?" Then there are the pot shots taken by fellow music lovers, who stroke their beards, cluck their tongues, and talk about, "What's to be done with this band with their shrill singer, overly complex songs, clinical drummer, and lyrics about dragons and sorcery?" Ninety-nine percent of the time all that drivel rolls right off my back. But for the past dozen or so years, right about this time, I'm reminded of all the insults and all the m...
8 More Christmas Albums You Need To Own

8 More Christmas Albums You Need To Own

Listcruft, Music
Several years ago I shared eight of my favorite (and best, if I may humbly say so) Christmas albums. I think it's high time to add to that list, so here are another eight Yuletide platters that would make worthy additions to any holiday music collection. As on the first list, there's enough variety here that you should be able to find something new to love. So here we go, in no particular order... #1 A Time to Be Jolly (1971) Bing Crosby Bing was in his late 60s and in the last decade of his legendary career when this was released on the brand new Daybreak Records label in 1971. The only thing that gives this away, however, are the vintage late-'60s/early '70s MOR musical arrangements, which are really quite nice. Most of the tracks on A Time to Be Jolly kick off with some sl
Gray Flannel Mixtape: The mellow side of prog

Gray Flannel Mixtape: The mellow side of prog

Music
To no one's surprise, last year's round of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees included not one progressive rock act.  This despite the millions of albums sold, the countless musicians inspired, and the long-lasting impact of the genre's best.  Hell, can anyone under 50 even name two Dave Clark Five songs?  Yeah, me neither. But to be fair, I can understand why someone not very familiar with prog rock might be inclined to write it off as so much boring instrumental wankery and bastardized classical music pastiches.  But to paint an endlessly rich style of music with such a broad brush is not only lazy, it's downright inaccurate.  So to show that prog ain't all clinical sweep arpeggios and no heart, I've put together a mixtape to showcase the gentler side of the genre. What we've got
Rush meets Colbert, Part Deux

Rush meets Colbert, Part Deux

Music, TV & Radio
OK, that was pretty damn cool.  Although it seems that many people are pissed at Colbert's antics while Rush performed "Tom Sawyer" on last night's The Colbert Report, I didn't think it was a big deal.  I've (hopefully) embedded a few clips from the Comedy Central website (if you don't see it, go here), so judge for yourselves... First, it appeared to me that Geddy was a little nervous, which is odd.  Maybe I'm just imagining things.  Also, it was weird seeing Neil as part of the interview, given his reputation as the most reclusive when it comes to interviews and media in general.  But his dry sense of humor was evident, which was cool to see ("They all have their own names.").  Alex was, well, Alex.  He looks a little thinner than in recent years, although the whole Friar Tuck
Gone but Not Forgotten – John Rutsey

Gone but Not Forgotten – John Rutsey

Music, People
Somehow this news escaped my attention when it first broke, but John Rutsey (co-founder and original drummer for Rush) died at age 55 over the weekend. Preliminary word is the cause of death was a heart attack possibly related to complications from diabetes, which he had been living with for decades. Rush fans know the background well - Rutsey helped co-found the band in Toronto during the summer of 1968, along with guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/singer Jeff Jones. Jones's stay was brief, and he was replaced in short order by Geddy Lee. After more lineup shifts the trio of Lee, Lifeson, and Rutsey was cemented in May 1971. It was this trio that released the band's self-titled debut in March 1974. Rutsey left Rush in July 1974, with the main causes reportedly being health conc...
YYFoo

YYFoo

Music
So this is pretty cool - a recent Foo Fighters show in Toronto was elevated to legendary status thanks to a guest appearance from two-thirds of Rush.  Witness "YYZ" with Taylor Hawkins, Geddy Lee, and Alex Lifeson...