Tag: art

These 1980s Star Trek Illustrations Are My Favorite Things Ever

These 1980s Star Trek Illustrations Are My Favorite Things Ever

Funny Stuff, Internet
Sometimes, my friends, fate smiles upon you. Such was the case for me recently when I stumbled upon a series of 1980s Star Trek illustrations in chalk pastel, some of which I will now share with you. Credit for these goes to artist Doug Little, who apparently produced these for commemorative posters around the time of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Enough chit chat, let's boldly go. By the way, I've saved the best for last. Awww. Posing for the sweetest prom photo I've ever seen are Dr. McCoy and the salt creature from the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "The Man Trap." Yes, this is Khan and Gonzo. And Gonzo is holding a yo-yo that actually says, "Khan Is a Yo-Yo." Let that seep for a few minutes. Of course! All we had to do to figure out what was on the mi...
Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Internet, Links
Here's a fresh batch of some quality interweb finds I've come across over the last 7 days: 38 Vintage Political Posters of World War II (Large Format Posters) "The Butterfly Effect" webcomic (Mr. Lovenstein) 15 Little-Known Facts About the Brothers Grimm (Associates Degree) Amazing baseball catch by ball girl (noob.us) Politics Explained! (Steve Jackson Games) Mister Rogers + clown mask = nightmare fuel (The Daily What) How much bigger are NFL players now? (Pro Football Reference) In Through the Out Door: Cover Songs We Heard Before the Classic Originals (Popdose)
Posters of the WPA

Posters of the WPA

Ephemera
Back in the day (1935 to be precise), President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Works Progress Administration (WPA), an enormous government program aimed at providing employment for millions of Americans affected by the Great Depression. The legacy of the WPA is a host of public works (bridges, roads, etc.) and cultural projects. That's all well and good obviously, but what I really care about are the cool posters designed to promote many of the WPA's programs. All of these images and hundreds more are available as part of the Library of Congress's "Posters of the WPA" collection. I've simply picked what I feel are some of the most visually appealing and added my usual pithy commentary. As you'll see, these great images are very much of their time and most display an Art Deco sensibili...