Tag: art rock

My favorite music: 1983

My favorite music: 1983

Music
If there's one thing the internet lacks, it's pointless music lists. So to fill that void, here's a sampling of my favorite albums from some random year. Let's say, 1983. (Spotify users, check out the accompanying playlist and subscribe!) Robert Plant, The Principle of Moments -- While I would in no way claim that Robert Plant's solo output bests Led Zeppelin's music, a lot of times I simply prefer to listen to Plant. In fact I'd say that Plant has enjoyed one of the most artistically rewarding solo careers of any artist who was part of a popular band that I can think of. The Principle of Moments is probably my favorite Plant solo effort (next to Fate of Nations) -- he sounds freed from the constraints of creating larger-than-life rock and the music just crackles with energy. "In the...
Listening Booth — Peter Gabriel at Rock Werchter, 1983

Listening Booth — Peter Gabriel at Rock Werchter, 1983

Listening Booth, Music
Another day, another listening booth, another great concert for your listening enjoyment. Today I offer up a recording of Peter Gabriel at the seventh annual Rock Werchter festival in Belgium. Gabriel took the stage on July 3 with four solo albums behind him, most recently 1982's Peter Gabriel (aka Security in America). Gabriel was already popular in his native Britain after his time as the lead singer of Genesis, but was just now on the verge of stardom in America thanks to the "Shock the Monkey" single. Remember, although everyone loves "Solsbury Hill" now it wasn't a hit when it was released in 1977. Gabriel and his band are in excellent form here, and the mixture of songs from the first four LPs is great. We even get a preview of "We Do What We're Told (Milgram's 37)," which wasn...
Platters that matter: 20 albums that changed my life (#10—#1)

Platters that matter: 20 albums that changed my life (#10—#1)

Listcruft, Music
At long last, I present the conclusion of my list of 20 albums that have had the most impact on me and my love of music. For a brief refresher, you can check the back half of the top 20 here. But for your convenience, here's the list: #20 — Queen, The Game #19 — Seals & Crofts, Summer Breeze #18 — Kiss, Creatures of the Night #17 — Iron Maiden, The Number of the Beast #16 — Run-D.M.C., Raising Hell #15 — Kiss, Alive! #14 — Rush, A Farewell to Kings #13 — Miles Davis, Kind of Blue #12 — Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Pictures at an Exhibition #11 — various artists, Jazz Master Files OK, now that we're all caught up, let's finish this thing already. As a reminder, this is no particular order but I know people love countdowns so there you go. #10 — Genesis, Duke If Rus
Album cover of the week: At War With the Mystics

Album cover of the week: At War With the Mystics

Album Cover of the Week
There are a handful of album covers from the Flaming Lips' discography worth of enshrinement as part of this series.  But for me it came down to a choice between their two best - Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots and the ultimate winner, At War With the Mystics.  I was tempted to go with Yoshimi because I like the album more, but this cover is just so damn good: My internet sleuthing tells me the cover art credit goes to Dan Lazenby, although I'm open to corrections on that.  Regardless, I love the mood created by the bright, explosive imagery and funky title font.  It looks it could be the cover of a musty old paperback book you stumble across while browsing the oft-overlooked Fantasy/Sci-Fi section at a rummage sale or flea market. Right under the Warner Bros. logo it says "Stere
2nd Chance Album Review – The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp

2nd Chance Album Review – The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp

Music
Just one year before prog-rock titans King Crimson released their first album, two-thirds of that band released their first and last studio album as the erstwhile trio of Giles, Giles & Fripp — guitarist Robert Fripp, Peter Giles on bass and brother Michael on drums. Released in 1968, during the height of the Psychedelic era, The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles & Fripp promptly sank into oblivion. But believe me, it's worth revisiting. If I had to surmise a reason why this album tanked, I'd say its oddly eclectic songs are a contributing factor. The album has a generous dose of cheeky, Kinks/Pythonesque humor, but most of the acts of the day were practicing a much darker and substantive form of psychedelia. Had this album been released even a year or 18 months earlier, it