Tuesday, May 26
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Tag: Boston

Saturday Serials: “Slaves of the Rising Sun” (Batman 1943, Chapter 4)

Saturday Serials: “Slaves of the Rising Sun” (Batman 1943, Chapter 4)

Movies
It's time for the fourth chapter in the 1943 Batman serial, "Slaves of the Rising Sun"! Kind of hard to mistake the implication in that title I suppose. But just in case you did, a slew of anti-Japanese epithets should clue you in. So we pick up from the end of chapter 3, where Batman and Robin engage in a spirited round of fisticuffs in order to thwart Dr. Daka's plan to blow up a supply train -- which I guess was a vital cog in American's war effort against Japan? -- and retrieve his lost radium gun. Aside from the opening action sequence, the absolute best part of "Slaves of the Rising Sun" is hearing Lewis Wilson's atrocious Indian accent. If you ever wondered what it would sound like if Boston was in the middle of India, you need to watch this. Related articles Satu...
This Week in History! (March 24-30)

This Week in History! (March 24-30)

History
March 24, 1989: The Exxon tanker Valdez accidentally hits the state of Alaska, spilling about 11 million gallons of oil. Capt. Joseph Hazlewood was later convicted of negligent discharge of oil and failing to leave a note at the scene of an accident. What's scary is that it's not even one of the 50 worst oil spills of all-time. March 27, 1884: The first long-distance telephone call takes place, between New York and Boston. Contrary to urban legend, the content of the call was not "Red Sox suck!" March 27, 1998: The Food and Drug Administration approves the use of Viagra; sales of used Corvettes and Mustangs drop 78%. March 28, 1930: Constantinople changes its name to Istanbul; provides fodder for quirky rock bands of the future. March 28, 1979: An accident at the Three Mile ...
Classic Thanksgiving ephemera – Indian Gum Cards

Classic Thanksgiving ephemera – Indian Gum Cards

Ephemera
In days of yore companies issued trading/bubble gum cards depicting not just baseball players, but even actors, U.S. Presidents, and license plates. One such manufacturer, the Goudey Gum Company of Boston, began issuing cards picturing Indian tribes and well-known Indians in 1933. This series ended in 1940, but Goudey began printing a new series depicting "Indian and Pioneer romantic days" in 1947. Shown here are two cards from that series, owned by a family member. Up top is a card showing a member of the Huichol, native to Western Central Mexico (yes I know that a native Mexican has nothing to do with American Thanksgiving). Most curiously about this card is that it speaks of the Huichol as if they were extinct, but according to their Wikipedia article they are very much alive...