Tag: California

Brochure Beauties #7: Sea World San Diego, 1964

Brochure Beauties #7: Sea World San Diego, 1964

Ephemera
Today's beauty comes to us from the mid 1960s, during what I think of as the golden age of amusement parks. It dates (I believe) from 1964, when the first Sea World opened in the Mission Bay area of San Diego, California. Located on 22 acres, the original vision for the park was a giant underwater restaurant. I think the amusement park was definitely the way to go. Sea World's owners spared no expense with this brochure, as it has the evocative prose and lush illustrations typical of the best brochures and advertising material of the mid-century period. Behold the beauty of the front cover: Let's take a closer look at that logo, for it is wonderful. Just two colors here, but a great contrast of typefaces. And turning the standard '60s grid globe into a fish? Genius. Bef...
Logo Evolution: Taco Bell

Logo Evolution: Taco Bell

Advertising
Taco Bell was founded in 1962 by Glen Bell, who had owned hot dog stands and other taco stands as far back as 1946. The first Taco-Tia stands opened in the early '50s and were the forerunner of Taco Bell. The first Taco Bell opened in Downey, California on March 21, 1962, and today the franchise boasts over 7,000 locations. As with any of my other logo capsules, dates may not be totally accurate. As is often the case with logos, older logos can stick around in advertising and building design for a while after their official expiration dates. 1962-72 The original Taco Bell logo design had two separate elements -- there was a colorful, blocky wordmark and a festive sombrero/bell sign. This was in widespread use for the first decade of Taco Bell's existence. Despite its first use...
Film at 11: A Gallery of Vintage TV News Program Ads

Film at 11: A Gallery of Vintage TV News Program Ads

Ephemera, TV & Radio
Sometimes I know that a post I'm putting together is destined to get 20 views if I'm lucky. But I have to follow my muse wherever she may lead me, and today she leads me to TV newsrooms across the country. I can't say exactly why, but I find these old advertisements for network TV news programs to be just so... quaint? Charming? I don't quite know how to put it. I just love how much these ads convey what it must have been like to watch the news back in the day -- not slick in the least. Just a bunch of square white men (and sometimes white women) reading the day's events. And now the news of the 1950s, '60s, and '70s...  
20 Beautiful Vintage Airline Travel Posters

20 Beautiful Vintage Airline Travel Posters

Ephemera, Featured Posts
In addition to their primary purpose in drumming up business for their company, airline travel posters of course wanted to get you in the mood to visit places all over the world. And without the benefit of a TV commercial, travel posters had to work overtime to help you paint a picture of exotic locales in your mind. Here are 20 such vintage travel posters that did their job exceptionally well, most dating from the 1950s and '60s. And if I may be allowed a shameless plug -- which I am -- I should tell you that some of these images are available as beautiful custom apparel and other products on my Zazzle shop. Why not go there now? Just click on The Hangar for all airline-related goods.
Time Capsule: Los Angeles Development Boom of the 1950s

Time Capsule: Los Angeles Development Boom of the 1950s

Capsules
In its July 13, 1953 issue Life magazine ran one of many photo essays on the city of Los Angeles. This one focused on the immense population and development growth the city and surrounding area encountered in the late '40s and early '50s. Here then is a gallery of the most interesting photos -- some unpublished -- that went into its story called "400 New Angels Every Day." There were all shot in either December '52 or July '53 by J. R. Eyerman. Less than two years after this piece ran in the magazine, Life published another, less sunny L.A. story -- this one about an October 1954 smog emergency. You can see those pics here.
The Evolution of Fast Food Logos: Top 10 Burger Chains Edition

The Evolution of Fast Food Logos: Top 10 Burger Chains Edition

Advertising, Featured Posts
I know I'm certainly not the first person on the internet to post a gallery showing the history of fast food logos. But I'll be honest -- a lot of the other ones I've seen have been half-hearted at best, completely lazy and misleading at worst. So here's my attempt to remedy that. Here is my turn at a gallery showing the evolution of fast food logos, featuring the top ten largest chains in America (measured by number of locations in 2010). Dates on some of these logos are estimated, as exact years are difficult to come by for some. If anyone has higher-resolution versions please let me know. #1. McDonald's (est. 1940) The restaurant that became McDonald's was started in 1937 in Monrovia, California by Patrick J. McDonald, and sold burgers and orange juice. In 1940 his sons Maurice and...
Book Report: Fletch (Gregory Mcdonald, 1974)

Book Report: Fletch (Gregory Mcdonald, 1974)

Books
It's taken me a long time to finally delve into Gregory Mcdonald's Fletch book series, although I can't give you a good reason why. I have loved the first movie for a few decades, so you'd think I would want to consume all I can about the character right from the source. But inertia is a powerful force, and so it is that I've finally started my journey this week. So, the original Fletch from 1974. If you're reading this I'm guessing you've seen the movie but not read the book, and want to know how closely the former follows the latter. So let's go ahead and get the story differences out of the way now. Needless to say, spoiler alert. Book Fletch is a blonde, not dark-haired like Chevy Chase. The Geena Davis movie role (Larry) is named Clara Snow in the book, and Fletch has a rathe...