Monday, April 6
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Tag: Camel

Celebrity Smokes: A Gallery of Star-Powered Cigarette Ads

Celebrity Smokes: A Gallery of Star-Powered Cigarette Ads

Featured Posts, Retrotisements
It seems inconceivable now, but until about the mid-1960s it was quite common to see celebrities hawking cigarettes like it was no big deal. In fact, many radio, TV, and movie stars literally owed their livelihood to sponsorship from tobacco companies. Imagine seeing someone like George Clooney or Angelina Jolie smiling widely in cigarette ads exhorting you to pick up a carton of Marlboro. Weird, isn't it? Anyway, here's a gallery of 20 such ads from the 1930s through the early 1960s featuring movie and TV stars, as well as famous athletes, using their star power to get you to buy cigarettes and cigars. Most of these ads are courtesy the Stanford Research into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising site.
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 19: Mickey Mouse at the 1934 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 19: Mickey Mouse at the 1934 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

Vintage Photo Wednesday
Macy held its first Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1924, making it one of the oldest and longest-running parades around. It's also been known in times past as the Macy's Christmas Parade and later the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Christmas Parade, but the idea is the same. Balloons, balloons, and more balloons! A big debut took place in 1934, when Mickey Mouse -- who debuted in 1928 -- appeared as a balloon for the first time. In a bit of cross-brand promotion, Mickey wore a Macy's star on his chest. Here's a photo from that 1934 parade, taken in the area of 46th Street and Broadway. Click for a larger version. Lots of fantastic details besides the balloon here. The timeless Coca-Cola sign is there of course. On the left is the Orpheum Dance Palace, which was a place where you could pay f
Album cover of the week: Mystery to Me

Album cover of the week: Mystery to Me

Album Cover of the Week, Music
Maybe someone more versed in Fleetwood Mac lore can explain this cover to me. But until then, I'll just enjoy the weirdness of it. It's the cover to the group's eighth studio album, 1973's Mystery to Me. OK, so it's a baboon on the beach, crying while eating a cake and... a book? Well that's confusing. Perhaps the answer to this mystery is on the back cover. Nope! Well except for the penguin, which was a band mascot of sorts (as well as being the name of Fleetwood Mac's previous album). Anyway, this cover was designed by Modula, who designed a bunch of Camel's coolest album covers from the same period. Related articles 10 Great Fleetwood Mac Songs That Are Written &/or Sung by Christine McVie (thewildheart1983.wordpress.com) Fletwood Mac - 1971-02-19 - San Berna...
Retrotisements: Father’s Day edition

Retrotisements: Father’s Day edition

Advertising, Retrotisements
When it comes to gift-giving -- and that is the point of holidays, right? -- Father's Day has to rank somewhere between Groundhog's Day and Flag Day in terms of pure lameness.  I would go so far as to say it's the lamest holiday, at least when you weigh the importance of the day's reason with the level of creativity employed by its celebrants.  I'm not pushing for dads to get bouquets of roses or anything, but why do Father's Day gifts almost end up being so... utilitarian? Listen, I like wearing nice clothes as much as the next guy but can we save the boring dress shirts for another day please?  Daddy was really hoping for the latest season of Ninja Warrior on DVD, but I guess this will do.  (Van Heusen, 1943) This year. why not show dad how much he means to you by givin
Retrotisements — Marlboro Cigarettes

Retrotisements — Marlboro Cigarettes

Retrotisements
Yeah, I know that most of the old ads I post have to do with cigarettes. For some reason I have always been fascinated by cigarette advertising. I guess part of it is that these types of ads might have been some of the first to market a lifestyle as much as a product. I mean sure, they all talked about the "flavor" and even the reduced tar levels — ignoring the point that they had any tar at all — but what it really boiled down to was that these companies had to find a way to make a smoke inhalation device seem appealing. Watching them find ways to rise to the challenge has always interested me. Oreos pretty much sell themselves after all. Same with beer and cars. But flammable paper tubes that allow you to suck on hot smoke? Now that takes marketing acumen. Marlboro is of course synony