Tag: college

Groovy College Course Catalogs of the 1970s

Groovy College Course Catalogs of the 1970s

Ephemera, Featured Posts
Whether for their graphic design, optimistic photographs, or quaint vintage charm, I always have a blast looking at old college course catalogs. So I'm going to share some of my favorites with you, grouped by decade. Up first are the groovy '70s. Here are one dozen college course catalogs from the Me Decade, covering both undergraduate and graduate schools from small junior/community colleges to well-known and prestigious universities. (All images courtesy the Internet Archive.)
Kodachrome Memories #4: Miami (OH) University Homecoming, 1953

Kodachrome Memories #4: Miami (OH) University Homecoming, 1953

Photography
This fantastic set of slides is reportedly from  Homecoming Weekend festivities for Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. As you would expect the marquee event of the celebration was a college football game. In this case it's the Redskins against in-state rival Ohio Bobcats, locally known as the Battle of the Bricks. The date on these slides is marked as 1954, but since the rivalry game that year was played in Athens I'm guessing this is actually 1953. That would put the date for this game as October 24, and is a game that ended in a 7-7 tie. There are no actual photos of the game here, but plenty from what look like pregame and perhaps halftime festivities. Also included are shots of a parade probably held on the campus and a few shots of the campus itself. Miami alumni are prominently
UNC Men’s Basketball 1972-73: “How You Doin’?”

UNC Men’s Basketball 1972-73: “How You Doin’?”

Ephemera
I don't handle college basketball ephemera on the Press Room (yet), but I couldn't not share this anyway. It's the media guide for the North Carolina Tar Heels' 1972-73 men's basketball season, and it is quite fetching for a few reasons. Here we see a quite fetching UNC co-ed being eyed, sort of creepily I might add, by a trio of UNC players including George Karl on the right. And hoo-boy are those some great pants he's wearing. But it's not his legs we're interested in, right? Ah, college life. As it turns out, putting pretty college women on the front of media guides and programs was not an uncommon practice, and I'm not even including cheerleaders in that category. But that's another topic for another post...
The word cloud of Robert Burton’s letter to Jeff Hathaway

The word cloud of Robert Burton’s letter to Jeff Hathaway

Sports
For those who haven't heard of Robert G. Burton, he's the winner of January's Douchebag of the Month award.  Burton, who has donated millions of dollars to the University of Connecticut football program and whose name adorns their athletic complex, was most displeased with the recent hiring of head coach Paul Pasqualoni. That's pretty standard I guess.  Boosters get pissy all the time when a coach gets hired/fired, or some other decision is made that they don't agree with.  But Burton took it a step further, firing off a rambling, boastful, and just plain obnoxious six-page letter to UConn Athletic Director Jeff Hathaway. The letter itself (excluding attachment notices and other miscellaneous text) is more than 1,700 words long.  So here's the word cloud for it, which pretty much sum
Commercials I hate: Education Connection

Commercials I hate: Education Connection

Advertising
Here's a classic example of "more is less".  There's nothing inherently bad or obnoxious about the current group of Education Connection commercials.  The problem comes from their sheer ubiquitousnes.  Day or night - regardless of channel it seems - this chick in her pajamas is in my face an average of every 7.2 minutes.  But I can understand why - how else would you be able to find out about online schools and scholarships? Oh wait, you can USE THE INTERNET. And how 'bout those production values!  Apparently this girl isn't just wearing pajamas, she's wearing see-through pajamas.  Look closely at them starting around the 23-second mark, and you'll see the graphics flying through her shorts.  I'll just assume none of these online schools teach TV production. Luckily Education