Tag: Crazy Eddie

Is There a Proper Way to Appreciate Nostalgia?

Is There a Proper Way to Appreciate Nostalgia?

Rants
"'Remember when' is the lowest form of conversation." -- Tony Soprano Anyone reading this site or my various social media outlets -- Like my Facebook page today! -- could figure out in three seconds that I trade largely in the past. And often, a past that occurred many years before I was born. In other words, my internet calling card is nostalgia. And I'm far from alone. If the multitude of websites, books, TV shows, and movies that are either informed or dominated by our shared pop culture heritage are any indication, people love thinking about and looking at things that happened a long time ago. If nostalgia were an actual industry -- and time spent wading in it were measurable in dollars -- it would probably rank somewhere just behind pharmaceuticals or tourism in America. ...
2010: The Gray Flannel Suit Year That Was

2010: The Gray Flannel Suit Year That Was

Blogstuff
It's been another fun year for me in running this site, and I'd like to thank all of you who visit regularly, irregularly, or even once.  I'd also like to thank everyone who has helped by contributing comments and post ideas.  It's good to know there's at least a few people out there who enjoy my little corner of the intertubes.  Since we're in the midst of year-end review season, let's take a quick look back at the posting year that was 2010 for The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. Most Popular Posts This is really what it's all about right?  It's always interesting to me to see what content takes off and what content gets largely ignored.  Since I want to stay positive I'll focus on the former.  So here are the eleven most-popular posts on the site for 2010. #11. Happy Hoff-Day! - Davi
Whatever happened to… Crazy Eddie and Bugle Boy?

Whatever happened to… Crazy Eddie and Bugle Boy?

History
Who: Crazy Eddie When: 1971 - 1989 What: Crazy Eddie, one of the most famous brands in the New York Tri-State area, started in 1971 with one location in Brooklyn.  It was run by Eddie Antar, whose high-pressure sales techniques and accounting creativity turned that one store into a regional chain covering four states and 43 locations, and with more than $300 million in sales.  The chain specialized in discount electronics, but later expanded into music sales.  But more than their prices or goods Crazy Eddie was known for their advertising, which featured a hyper pitchman named Jerry Carroll.  Carroll's frenetic, absurdly comic delivery was so effective many people assumed he was Crazy Eddie. What happened: Turns out the secret to Antar's success was simple - he was a total crook