Tag: crime

GFS Home Movies: The Stranger (1946)

GFS Home Movies: The Stranger (1946)

Movies
The storytelling device of the Nazi hunter in search of German war criminals scattered to the four winds after World War II has been around so long, it's hard to imagine a time when it was really fresh. And so it must have seemed especially visceral for audiences to watch Orson Welles' 1946 film noir classic The Stranger, released just 17 days after the first anniversary of V-E Day. The central plot of The Stranger concerns Mr. Wilson (the ever-brilliant Edward G. Robinson) of the United Nations War Crimes Commission and his hunt for the infamous Nazi war criminal Franz Kindler. Wilson releases a German prisoner and confederate of Kindler, Konrad Meinike (Konstantin Shayne), in the hopes that he will lead him to Kindler. Before long the story shifts to the bucolic New England town o
10 Great Juvenile Delinquent/Teen Exploitation Movie Posters

10 Great Juvenile Delinquent/Teen Exploitation Movie Posters

Ephemera, Featured Posts, Movies
You shrieked in terror at my gallery of vintage '80s horror movie posters... you gasped at my science fiction movie posters of the '50s... now tremble at this gallery of movie posters featuring juvenile delinquent/teen exploitation films of the '40s through the '70s! #1. Teen Age Thunder (1957) #2. Switchblade Sisters (1975) #3. Juvenile Jungle (1958) #4. Live Fast, Die Young (1958) #5. Youth Runs Wild (1944) #6. The Cool and the Crazy (1958) #7. Reform School Girl (1957) #8. Riot in Juvenile Prison (1959) #9. Untamed Youth (1957) #10. Girls Under 21 (1940)
Book Report: Fletch (Gregory Mcdonald, 1974)

Book Report: Fletch (Gregory Mcdonald, 1974)

Books
It's taken me a long time to finally delve into Gregory Mcdonald's Fletch book series, although I can't give you a good reason why. I have loved the first movie for a few decades, so you'd think I would want to consume all I can about the character right from the source. But inertia is a powerful force, and so it is that I've finally started my journey this week. So, the original Fletch from 1974. If you're reading this I'm guessing you've seen the movie but not read the book, and want to know how closely the former follows the latter. So let's go ahead and get the story differences out of the way now. Needless to say, spoiler alert. Book Fletch is a blonde, not dark-haired like Chevy Chase. The Geena Davis movie role (Larry) is named Clara Snow in the book, and Fletch has a rathe...
Fall TV Preview Madness! (ABC, 1985)

Fall TV Preview Madness! (ABC, 1985)

TV & Radio
In Fall TV Preview Madness, I present a network television schedule preview special from the distant past. We see the good, bad, and ugly for a network's entire upcoming fall slate. I’m counting down the days until the Fall 2012 television season gets underway the only way I know how — by bringing you network promos for TV seasons long gone. Today’s preview is for ABC’s 1985 Fall TV season. ABC only returned 11 scripted series in 1985-86, compared to 15 for CBS and 18 for NBC. They also had the most shows from the previous season not returning, with 16. By season's end, ABC had two just shows in the ratings Top 10 (Dynasty and Who's the Boss?), and six in the Top 30. Here's the 1985 ABC Fall preview (in two parts), complete with an appropriation of Randy Newman's "I Love L.A."
Fall TV Preview Madness! (NBC, 1975)

Fall TV Preview Madness! (NBC, 1975)

TV & Radio
In Fall TV Preview Madness, I present a network television schedule preview special from the distant past. We see the good, bad, and ugly for a network's entire upcoming fall slate. Today's preview is for NBC's 1975 Fall TV season, dubbed the Superseason. The network debuted nine new series, hoping to build on the successes of young hits like Little House on the Prairie, Chico and the Man, and Sanford and Son. Their boldest play came on Thursday, where the entire prime time lineup was filled with freshman shows. Here's a quick promo from '75. Unfortunately, success proved elusive for these new programs, none of which lasted past the 1975-76 season. Thursday in particular was rough, as NBC was up against ratings powerhouses like The Waltons and The Streets of San Francisco. Th...
Saturday Serials: “The Doom of the Rising Sun” (Batman 1943, Chapter 15)

Saturday Serials: “The Doom of the Rising Sun” (Batman 1943, Chapter 15)

Movies
This is it! This is the final thrilling chapter in the 1943 Columbia Pictures Batman serial film. At last, all of our perseverance and dedication will be paid off, for surely Batman and Robin will triumph over the evil Japanese would-be saboteur Dr. Daka and his sinister henchmen. Right? Yes, of course. Don't be silly. But first the Caped Crusader must escape imprisonment in his wooden coffin. Looks like it'll be up to the Boy Wonder to save the day! But not before Batman can spew a little period racism... I like how Batman immediately tries to un-zombify Linda Page, without first testing the device on someone less, uh, necessary. Anyway, stay tuned to this column for another exciting vintage serial! As soon as  I figure out which one to do next...
Saturday Serials: “The Executioner Strikes” (Batman 1943, Chapter 14)

Saturday Serials: “The Executioner Strikes” (Batman 1943, Chapter 14)

Movies
And so we've arrived at the penultimate chapter of the 1943 Columbia Pictures Batman serial film. In the last chapter, the lovely Linda Page -- Bruce Wayne's fiancée -- was turned into one of Dr. Daka's mindless zombie slaves, and Batman found himself in a classic Looney Tunes trap: the wall of spikes. Boy, if I had a nickel for every time that happened to me! Only the fortuitous arrival of Robin saves the Caped Crusader from becoming a shish kebat. But will the duo finally be able to thwart Daka once and for all? My guess is no, since there's still one more chapter left, but I've been wrong before. Maybe the last part is just 15 minutes of Bruce and Dick Grayson gloating over Daka's corpse or something. Related articles Saturday Serials: "Eight Steps Down" (Batman 1943, Ch
Saturday Serials: “Eight Steps Down” (Batman 1943, Chapter 13)

Saturday Serials: “Eight Steps Down” (Batman 1943, Chapter 13)

Movies
And just like that, it's Saturday again, which can mean only one thing -- it's time for another edition of Saturday Serials, currently showing the 1943 Columbia Pictures Batman feature starring Lewis Wilson as the Caped Crusader. Today we look at the thirteenth chapter in our saga, "Eight Steps Down." After completely failing to rescue Linda Page in the last chapter, Batman does some legit detective work to track her down. I love the quaintness of Batman having to stop by a call box on the street to talk to the police. Ah, simpler days. We also get a lesson in etiquette, as Daka informs Linda that you should address people from Japan as "Nipponese" and not "Jap." So what does that "Eight Steps Down" mean anyway? Well I'm not sure, even after watching this. But I can say that the c...
Saturday Serials: “Embers of Evil” (Batman 1943, Chapter 12)

Saturday Serials: “Embers of Evil” (Batman 1943, Chapter 12)

Movies
We're so close! After this week, there are only three chapters left in the 1943 Batman serial film! Sadly, Daka's henchmen still haven't figured out that blowing up a building is a less than effective way to kill Batman and Robin. That's lucky for us I suppose, since otherwise this series would've ended weeks ago. One of the shortcomings of the serial format is fairly clear to me now. There really are only so many ways to end each segment with a cliffhanger putting the hero's life in danger. This is at least the second or third time Batman's been trapped in a burning building or wreck in this series. It does start to feel worn out at a certain point. I don't know, maybe it felt fresher 70 years ago. Related articles Saturday Serials: "A Nipponese Trap" (Batman 1943, Chapter