Tag: easy listening

Album Cover of the Week: Two Sides of Eydie Gormé

Album Cover of the Week: Two Sides of Eydie Gormé

Album Cover of the Week
With the passing of beloved singer Eydie Gormé (of the famed Steve and Eydie duo) at the age of 84, let's look at a pair of her album covers from the 1950s. The first is the understated sophistication of 1959's Eydie Swings the Blues (ABC-Paramount, ABC-192). Photography credit for this goes to Arthur Siegel. This cover is pretty much mid-century elegance defined, wouldn't you agree? Meanwhile, here's a fun little number from the next year. It's 1960's Eydie in Dixieland (ABC-Paramount, ABC/ABCS 343). Cover photography by Gary Wagner. RIP, Eydie.
Top 10 Jackie Gleason Album Covers

Top 10 Jackie Gleason Album Covers

Album Cover of the Week, Music
I've already written about the musical career of the Great One, Jackie Gleason, as well as talked about one of my favorite Gleason album covers (Music for Lovers Only). I thought I'd go ahead and dedicate an entire album cover gallery drawn from Gleason's catalog of mid-century orchestral pop -- aka mood music. So here's a collection of my ten favorite Jackie Gleason album covers, drawn from his extensive Capitol Records run (nearly 60 LPs, including soundtracks and compilations, from the early '50s through the early '70s). These all come from the first ten years of his catalog, and I think you'll see why. #1. Music for Lovers Only (1952) #2. Lonesome Echo (1955) This was Gleason's fifth #1 album, and the artwork was by the legendary Salvador Dali. He described the concept of t...
Sammy Sosa — Pinterest Sensation, Music Star!

Sammy Sosa — Pinterest Sensation, Music Star!

Funny Stuff
In case you haven't already seen, Sammy Sosa -- former Major League Baseball star, bat corker, and Hall of Fame wannabe -- has undertaken a bizarre strategy for improving his public image. And by that I mean he's not only Tweeting, he has a Pinterest page. But rather than use Pinterest for its intended purpose -- sharing pictures of food and kicky shoes -- he's published nothing but posed portraits of himself. To compound the oddness, every photo bears an identical description: "Sammy Sosa. Yes, I'm the real Sammy Sosa, and this is my Pinterest." In looking at Sosa's pinned photos, featuring him posing uncomfortably either in a snappy blue suit or mustard yellow sweater, I was struck by how much some of the photos looked like the cover to a never-released album of lounge music or easy l...
Music from the Worst Album Covers — Merry Christmas & Happy New Year with the Mom and Dads

Music from the Worst Album Covers — Merry Christmas & Happy New Year with the Mom and Dads

Album Cover of the Week, Music
We’ve all seen at least one article showing the worst album covers of all-time. But what about the music inside? Should you judge an album by its horrible cover? Well in this series, we’re going to find out. Today we examine Merry Christmas & Happy New Year by The Mom and Dads. I'll say this much for the 1972 holiday album Merry Christmas & Happy New Year by the Mom and Dads -- if ever there was a Christmas album that sounded exactly like you would expect it to, this is it. I'm not going to sit here and judge whether or not that's a positive thing; I'm just throwing it out there as a heads up of sorts. Yes, that's the actual group on the cover. We've got (l to r) Quentin Ratliff (saxophone), Harold Hendren (drums), Doris A. Crow (piano), and Leslie Welch (accordion) l
Album cover of the week: A Day in the Life

Album cover of the week: A Day in the Life

Album Cover of the Week
An album cover doesn't have to be pretty to be great.  And that's certainly the case with jazz guitar legend Wes Montgomery's A Day in the Life, released in 1967. I'm not sure what the inspiration was behind this rather striking cover photo was, as I don't imagine it would have appealed to people in the late '60s, even though smoking was obviously much more acceptable then.  I know Montgomery was a smoker, so that likely played a part. Anyway, this was Montgomery's debut for A&M Records, and came out a year before his untimely death at age 43.  By the time of A Day in the Life's release, Montgomery had all but abandoned jazz for more straightforward pop.  This is partially reflected in the song selection, which featured contemporary hits like "When a Man Loves a Woman" and "W