Tag: England

Listening Booth — The New Mastersounds, “You Mess Me Up”

Listening Booth — The New Mastersounds, “You Mess Me Up”

Listening Booth, Music
With all the crap I've been dealing with thanks to Hurricane Sandy, I've had precious little time for music listening. And that means I haven't been able to really dig into the new record from the New Mastersounds, Out on the Faultline. I mean to correct that today, and the first step is sharing the official video for the first song off the LP, "You Mess Me Up." It's a fun video for an even funner song. That's right, funner. The group's last album, Breaks from the Border, made my 2011 year-end best of list, and I have a feeling this one will too. Out on the Faultline is available now! And if you're on Spotify, you can check out this track and most of the ones featured in my Listening Booth series by subscribing to this playlist.
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 — Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 — Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s

Featured Posts, Vintage Photo Wednesday
This is the first of what I hope will be a long-running feature on the site. Each Wednesday I'll post a handful of vintage photographs that strike my fancy. Some weeks there will be a theme, others not so much. If you have any subjects you'd like me to look for, or have photos you'd like to share, let me know! This week's collection is drawn from the Photochrom Print Collection on the Library of Congress website. From the site: The Photochrom Print Collection has almost 6,000 views of Europe and the Middle East and 500 views of North America. Published primarily from the 1890s to 1910s, these prints were created by the Photoglob Company in Zürich, Switzerland, and the Detroit Publishing Company in Michigan. The richly colored images look like photographs but are actually ink-based phot
Road Trip! — Ten Songs Inspired by Real Places

Road Trip! — Ten Songs Inspired by Real Places

Featured Posts, Listcruft, Music
Many people are inspired by their favorite songs about places to visit the locations that inspired them. But don't bother looking for 22 Acacia Avenue or Xanadu on Google Maps -- they don't exist anywhere but in their songwriters' minds. Elsewhere, however, there are plenty of songs that were inspired by real places. Here are ten of them, should you feel the urge to make a pilgrimage. (You can also check out this list on my Spotify playlist.) #1. "Lakeside Park" -- Rush Rush drummer and lyricist Neil Peart grew up in Port Dalhousie, Ontario and spent many youthful summers on the village's most popular beach -- Lakeside Park. Peart paid tribute in an atypically nostalgic song on Rush's third album, 1975's Caress of Steel. Peart later reminisced about his Lakeside Park experience
Prepare for a funky summer from the New Mastersounds

Prepare for a funky summer from the New Mastersounds

Music
Unless you're a connoisseur of modern-day funk and soul you likely haven't heard of the New Mastersounds. That's a shame, because for more than a decade this Leeds-based outfit has been churning out some of the tightest, most hip-shaking grooves around. The quartet is currently touring the United States and recording their upcoming album here (Tornillo, Texas to be precise) -- a first for them. In another change, the band will be adding vocals to their previously instrumental attack. To give fans a preview of what's to come, the New Mastersounds recently released a cool behind-the-scenes video for the making of the album, Breaks From the Border. Check it out: Related articles The New Mastersounds: Spring Tour (jambase.com)
Farewell, Corporal Buckles

Farewell, Corporal Buckles

History, People
America's last living link with World War I is gone. Frank Buckles, the oldest remaining U.S. veteran of the Great War, died yesterday at age 110. Buckles was one of only three remaining veterans of WWI throughout the world. Buckles, born in 1901, enlisted with the U.S. Army in August 1917 after being turned down by the Marine Corps and the Navy. He was only 16 years old but, like many of his era, lied about his age in order to serve his country. In fact, after being rejected by recruiters in his native Kansas, Buckles traveled to Oklahoma City and kept at it until the Army agreed to take him. He was one of more than 4.7 million Americans to sail to Europe as part of the American Expeditionary Forces. Buckles joined the First Fort Riley Casual Detachment and shipped out for England i...
GFS home movies: SoulBoy

GFS home movies: SoulBoy

Movies
I don't think it's possible for me to watch a coming-of-age dance movie like SoulBoy without tracing some threads back to the godfather of them all - Saturday Night Fever.  The key story elements are all there.  Working-class boy meets a girl seemingly beyond reach, and sets about to win her through the power of dance.  He is oblivious to the adoration of a more down-to-earth girl.  Along the way he grows up a little, comes to resent his clownish friends, and it all ends with a climactic dance-off for all the glory. The two leading men - Martin Compston's Joe McCain and John Travolta's Tony Manero - seem to be cut from the same cloth.  They're both working class stiffs (Joe is a delivery boy, Tony is a paint store lackey), they both find purpose in dancing, and they both eventually
Book report: Single & Single

Book report: Single & Single

Books
Don't let the title fool you - Single & Single is in fact not the new name for Jon & Kate Plus 8.  It's actually a 1999 novel by John le Carré, who made a name for himself in 1963 with The Spy Who Came in From the Cold.  I picked it up a few years ago solely because le Carré is the author, which should tell you how much I liked The Spy Who Came in From the Cold. I don't know if I was aware that Single & Single isn't a spy novel when I bought it, but it doesn't really matter because it might as well be. All the familiar elements are here, but in the post-Cold War world we have to make do with cutthroat Russian mobsters rather than crafty KGB agents, and put-upon British bureaucrats who lack the zip of the agents of yesteryear.  Fighting crime just isn't as interesting as figh
GFS home movies: The Queen

GFS home movies: The Queen

Movies
I've never been much of a Royal Watcher, that devoted group of people who follow the affairs of the British royal family like others follow the characters and plot of Lost or The Godfather. While the notion of a monarchy appeals to my sense of order and love of history, I know that in almost all cases the idea looks better on paper than in reality. As an American, I suppose that anti-monarchist sentiment is ingrained in my DNA. But still, there is something fascinating about watching the institution function in our so-called modern times. The troublesome duality of the British crown is exemplified brilliantly in The Queen, starring Helen Mirren as...the queen. Mirren deservedly won the Oscar for Best Actress for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II, who at the age of 25 ascended to t...
London’s 2012 Olympic logo is awesome

London’s 2012 Olympic logo is awesome

Funny Stuff, Sports
And by awesome I mean craptacular. Seriously, did they even try? They've had two years to put this together, and it looks like something my six-year-old nephew could put together in Microsoft Paint with a blindfold on. Ooooh, it says 2012 if you look closely! OMG!!@@#! (Actually, it looks like Lisa Simpson giving something that rhymes with 'snow job'.) Seriously, I think London really dropped the ball on this one. What they needed to do was to create something more appealing and lasting -- something that speaks to the rich heritage of Great Britain, as well as its many contributions to world culture. Since it's not too late for them to change their minds, I've come up with a few ideas (with all respect to my readers from across the Pond, of course). I just hope the roya...