Sunday, March 29
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Tag: fast food

Product warning labels we really need

Product warning labels we really need

Funny Stuff
Because the government refuses to just come out and ban cigarettes outright, we get brilliant programs like the recently announced FDA campaign to place more graphic warning labels on packs of smokes.  Here's an example of what they're planning to do: Effective and scary!  I guess.  I know I don't ever want to smoke Brand cigarettes, that much is certain.  Anyway, I suppose it's only a matter of time before the gubmint steps in and tries to scare us from buying all manner of products that can cause real harm, so I've whipped up a few labels to save the taxpayers a little money. Fast Food (more…)
I have a dream that one day, faceless corporations will pander to me based on my skin color

I have a dream that one day, faceless corporations will pander to me based on my skin color

Advertising
As a middle-class white male, I know I'm not really in much of a position to bitch about being overlooked or disadvantaged.  Still, I'll admit feeling a bit like the odd man out when one of my (formerly) favorite fast food establishments, McDonald's, launched their "I'm Lovin' It" ad campaign in 2003.  Few things are more transparent and painful than when a business makes an obvious attempt to pander to minorities, because they usually do such a piss poor job. Oh sure, fast food chains targeting black people is nothing new, so that's no big deal in and of itself.  But historically for TV ads, it seems the chains had their regular campaigns and then they had their "black" ads, replete with awful R&B-esque music and sad attempts to look hip.  But McDonald's took it to a whole new leve
Retrotisements – Burger King ’76

Retrotisements – Burger King ’76

Retrotisements
You wouldn't know it these days, but it is in fact possible to market fast food to black Americans without acting as if they all loved either lame rap or watered down R&B; or as if they all spoke whatever the hip, urban vernacular of the day is (yes, I'm aware of just how painfully white that sentence makes me seem). And I have the proof right here, in the form of two vintage Burger King print advertisements from 1976.  There's no pandering or awkward attempts to integrate African-American culture here.  Well, perhaps a small one in the first ad (can you spot it?). Your eye may first be drawn by those groovy fashions, but I immediately took note of the old-school wood decor found in BK establishments of the time.  Sadly, that wooden sign and many like it are either rottin
Total freakout, maaaan!

Total freakout, maaaan!

Advertising, Rants
I've been known to enjoy one or two of these so-called "fast food" ham-burgers in my lifetime. I know they're no good for me, and I don't care. And sure, if something I order isn't prepared correctly or just not available, I have gotten annoyed. That's simply because I don't suffer incompetence lightly. But the level of betrayal exhibited by the people in Burger King's new "Whopper Freakout" ad campaign is simultaneously amusing and disturbing. Some customers were confused and mildly upset (Emo kid at the 1:11 mark) by the loss of the Whopper, while some became wistful and nostalgic (goatee dude at 3:18). And when their precious Whopper is secretly replaced with Folgers Crys...ur, another burger, some customers became downright apoplectic (start at 5:30). The campaign is su...