Tag: Fleer

Vintage TV Show Trading Card Packs of the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s

Vintage TV Show Trading Card Packs of the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s

TV & Radio
Few things indicate that a TV show has broken through into pop culture at large like getting its own set of trading cards. Naturally, most of these programs don't really need or deserve a trading card set, but that's another topic altogether. While some shows -- particularly ones heavy on action or in the sci-fi/fantasy genres -- lend themselves to interesting cards, more often than not you just got a still photo of some cast member that says, "Remember that this was a person on our show? So do we." Regardless, let's look take a trip back to the days when you could find cards for almost any show imaginable, issued by giants of the field such as Topps, Donruss, and Fleer.
Worst Sports Cards Ever #1: Brad Mills (Fleer 1982)

Worst Sports Cards Ever #1: Brad Mills (Fleer 1982)

Ephemera, Sports
Former Montreal Expos infielder Brad Mills played in the Big Leagues for just 106 games over four seasons but has enjoyed a long coaching career since. In fact, I think it's safe to say that the most memorable thing to come from his playing career is this 1982 Fleer baseball card, capturing him in what was probably a common position. I don't know if you could consider Mills to have been an integral part of the Expos' improbably run to the 1981 NLCS, but thanks to him no gum went unchewed.
1968 Fleer Major League Baseball Team Logo Tallboy Cloth Patches (American League)

1968 Fleer Major League Baseball Team Logo Tallboy Cloth Patches (American League)

Sports
From 1967 through 1975, the Fleer company issued a series of attractive cloth patches featuring the names, logos, and emblems of most Major League Baseball franchises. What I have for you today is the 1968 cloth patch set, specifically the ten American League teams from that season. Each patch set was comprised of three smaller patches -- one with the primary team logo, a smaller secondary logo hat patch, and a team name shoulder patch. The entire set measures 2.5" by 4.2", which is why they're known as "tallboys" by collectors.
Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: AFC West

Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: AFC West

Football Friday, Sports
Since it’s the off-season I thought I’d start a fun project involving NFL history. So I’m going to go division by division and post galleries of football cards (when available) featuring all NFL players who have had their jersey numbers retired by their teams. This week it’s the four squads of the AFC West — the Denver Broncos, Kansas City Chiefs, Oakland Raiders, and San Diego Chargers. Previous galleries: AFC East, NFC East, AFC North, NFC North, AFC South, NFC South Denver Broncos (3) #7 -- John Elway #18 -- Frank Tripucka #44 -- Floyd Little Kansas City Chiefs (10) #3 -- Jan Stenerud #16 -- Len Dawson #18 -- Emmitt Thomas #28 -- Abner Haynes #33 -- Stone Johnson On August 30, 1963, rookie RB/KR Stone Johnson suffered a fractured vertebra in his neck duri
Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: NFC South

Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: NFC South

Football Friday, Sports
Since it’s the off-season I thought I’d start a fun project involving NFL history. So I’m going to go division by division and post galleries of football cards (when available) featuring all NFL players who have had their jersey numbers retired by their teams. This week it’s the four squads of the NFC South — the Atlanta Falcons, Carolina Panthers, New Orleans Saints, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Previous galleries: AFC East, NFC East, AFC North, NFC North, AFC South Atlanta Falcons (0) The Falcons do not retire jersey numbers, but in 2004 they established their own Ring of Honor for former players. The inductees to date are Steve Bartkowski, Deion Sanders, William Andrews, Jeff Van Note, Jessie Tuggle, Tommy Nobis, Mike Kenn, and Claude Humphrey. Carolina Panthers (1) #51 -- Sam M
Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: NFC East

Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: NFC East

Football Friday, Sports
Since it’s the off-season I thought I’d start a fun project involving NFL history. So I’m going to go division by division and post football card galleries (when available) featuring all NFL players who have had their jersey numbers retired by their teams. This week it’s the four squads of the NFC East — the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, Philadelphia Eagles, and Washington Redskins. Previous galleries: AFC East Dallas Cowboys (0) The Cowboys do not officially retire jersey numbers, opting rather to induct players into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor. The Ring, which began in 1975, is made up of the players listed below (as of the end of the 2012 season, in order of induction). Sorry, no cards for the Cowboys, since they insist on being so different. #74 -- Bob Lilly #17 -- Don
Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: AFC East

Retired NFL Jersey Numbers: AFC East

Football Friday, Sports
Since it's the off-season  I thought I'd start a fun project involving NFL history. So I'm going to go division by division and post football card galleries (when available) featuring all NFL players who have had their jersey numbers retired by their teams. This week it's the four squads of the AFC East -- the Buffalo Bills, Miami Dolphins, New England Patriots, and New York Jets. Buffalo Bills (1) #12 -- Jim Kelly Believe it or not, #12 is the only jersey number officially retired by the Bills. There are three other numbers that aren't issued anymore -- #32, #34, and #78 -- but they have not been retired. It's unlikely that OJ Simpson's number ever will be at this point. Miami Dolphins (3) #12 -- Bob Griese #13 -- Dan Marino #39 -- Larry Csonka New England Patriots (7)
A Gallery of Forgettable Sports Cards

A Gallery of Forgettable Sports Cards

Ephemera, Sports
I can't begin to calculate the number of hours I spent as a lad collecting, storing, and trading sports cards. I never cared about their monetary value (unlike many of my friends). I simply enjoyed the experience of opening the packs, looking at the pictures, and filling in holes in my collection. It's a good thing too, as 99% of my collection isn't worth the paper it was printed on. I got out of the sports card scene right about the time it became more of a business venture than a hobby. And now thanks to unscrupulous manufacturers, collectors, and dealers the industry exists now as a shadow of its former glory. There are many reasons for this decline, but as I dug through the remnants of my collection the other day the common denominator occurred to me - most of the cards flat out suc...