Tag: France

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1900 – 1940)

Ephemera, Featured Posts
Getting to a World's Fair is definitely one of the items on my bucket list. But until I can attend one in person, I guess the next best thing will have to be to look at some vintage World's Fair postcards. The selection I present here spans every officially sanctioned and recognized fair and exposition from the first half of the 20th century. Due to the outbreak of World War II, there were no fairs held between 1941 and 1957. The next part of this overview (to be published later) will pick up with Expo 58 and run through Expo '98. Exposition Universelle (Paris, 1900) (via) Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo, 1901) Louisiana Purchase Exposition (St. Louis, 1904) (via Brenda) Liège International (Belgium, 1905) (via alanp_photo) Milan International (1906) Irish International
Vintage Record Labels Abound on This 1970 Barclay Group Ad

Vintage Record Labels Abound on This 1970 Barclay Group Ad

Advertising
Long-time readers of this blog already know how much I love talking about and looking at vintage record label art. So imagine my delight when I stumbled on this ad from the May 30, 1970 issue of Billboard magazine. It's part of a tribute to French record executive Eddie Barclay, known in France as le roi du microsillon ("The King of Microgroove)." This ad is in celebration of the beginning of the third decade for the Barclay Group, founded in 1949. It shows the center ring art for the imprints his company distributed. I had to do a little cleanup, and I think the result is pretty cool. Click for a larger version. Just for reference, the labels in this ad are (from left to right in descending order) Amadeo Records, Atco Records, Atlantic Records, Barclay Records, Black and Blue Re
Images of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy — June 6, 1944

Images of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy — June 6, 1944

History, Photography
The Normandy landings, codenamed Operation Neptune, were the landing operations of the Allied invasion of Normandy, in Operation Overlord, during World War II. The landings commenced on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 (D-Day), beginning at 6:30 am British Double Summer Time (GMT+2). In planning, D-Day was the term used for the day of actual landing, which was dependent on final approval.
Retrotisements: Halloween (1978) U.S. and Foreign Movie Posters

Retrotisements: Halloween (1978) U.S. and Foreign Movie Posters

Featured Posts, Retrotisements
This piece originally ran in October 2008. I've republished it because, really, this should run annually. But to show I'm not just being lazy, I've added posters from Denmark and Italy below! October 25 marks a momentous day in horror history — the 30th anniversary of the release of John Carpenter's slasher classic Halloween.  While it certainly wasn't the first horror film on the block, it is one of the best and most influential. I and many other fans of classic horror consider it to be part of the holy trinity of the genre, alongside Friday the 13th (1980) and A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984). In retrospect, it seems like such a simple concept that it's hard to believe it hadn't been fully explored before. A psychopath is on the loose in the streets of a quiet, suburban town (Haddo
Photo Gallery: World War I in Color

Photo Gallery: World War I in Color

Featured Posts, History, Photography
If there is one conflict that did more than any other to forever vanquish the notion of warfare as a noble and brave pursuit, it was World War I. The Great War, as it was widely referred to until World War II, had an deep and lasting psychological impact on not just the combatants, but on society in general. It was the first war to be fought with mass-produced, mechanized tools of destruction such as tanks, war planes, U-boats, flamethrowers, and cannons of enormous size and range. The lasting images of World War I have been almost entirely in bleak, grainy black and white, which have only served to enhance the images of death and despair. But there exists film and photographs in color that allow us to view World War I as more real and something almost contemporary. Even the most mundan...
Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 3

Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 3

Ephemera
And so ends our three-part journey through 1960s Germany (as presented by View-Master). Today we say auf wiedersehen to Bavaria and head northwest to the states of Baden-Württemberg, Rhineland-Palatinate, North Rhine-Westphalia, and Lower Saxony. #1 - Black Forest Farmhouse Has Stable in Rear OK, so not every View-Master picture can be a winner. #2 - Heidelberg's Arched Bridge and Famous Castle This bridge has spanned the Neckar River since 1786. That's a long time. #3 - Cochem Castle Overlooks Moselle Valley The Reichsburg Cochem had its first documentary mention in 1130. In 1151, it was occupied by King Konrad III, who declared it an Imperial castle. In 1688, the castle was overrun by French King Louis XIV's troops in the course of the Nine Years' War (known in Ge
Farewell, Corporal Buckles

Farewell, Corporal Buckles

History, People
America's last living link with World War I is gone. Frank Buckles, the oldest remaining U.S. veteran of the Great War, died yesterday at age 110. Buckles was one of only three remaining veterans of WWI throughout the world. Buckles, born in 1901, enlisted with the U.S. Army in August 1917 after being turned down by the Marine Corps and the Navy. He was only 16 years old but, like many of his era, lied about his age in order to serve his country. In fact, after being rejected by recruiters in his native Kansas, Buckles traveled to Oklahoma City and kept at it until the Army agreed to take him. He was one of more than 4.7 million Americans to sail to Europe as part of the American Expeditionary Forces. Buckles joined the First Fort Riley Casual Detachment and shipped out for England i...
Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Books
It's hard to imagine, especially for those of my generation or younger, but broadcast news was not always a wasteland of vacuous celebrity gossip, shallow political "analysis", or crude sensationalism.  There was in fact a time when the men and women who called themselves broadcast journalists were actually journalists first, broadcasters secondly.  A time when networks valued the insight and knowledge these broadcasters brought, with not nearly as much regard for profit. And for a period of almost 20 years starting in the late 1930s, there was one group of broadcast journalists more insightful, knowledgeable, professional, and popular than all others.  They were the Murrow Boys, started and led by the legendary Edward R. Murrow.  While most people still know his name, the names of the
Vintage Tabletop: Touring

Vintage Tabletop: Touring

Ephemera, Games & Toys
For the deluxe presentation of Touring, head over to the Touring page on the main site. In 1906, cars were still considered a luxury item in the United States, well beyond the reach of the common folk.  And yet two years before the legendary Model T ushered in the era of affordable automobiles for the masses, the now-defunct Wallie Dorr Company figured the time was right to capitalize on what was still a niche product.  And to do so they unveiled a new card game based on the expensive, newfangled horseless carriage - Touring. You probably haven't heard of Touring but you've likely heard of its successor, Mille Bornes.  The idea is the same, really.  Players are engaged in a race of X miles (the figure changed over the years), and can play delay/hazard cards to stop or slow down their