Tag: Germany

Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 2

Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 2

Ephemera
Welcome back, meine freunde! I hope you enjoyed the first part of our trip through 1960s Germany, courtesy my View-Master collection. Our journey continues on reel two, where we stop by beautiful Bavaria in southeast Germany. One of the oldest states of Europe, Bavaria was established as a duchy in the mid first millennium. In the 17th century, the Duke of Bavaria became a Prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire. The Kingdom of Bavaria existed from 1806 to 1918, and Bavaria has since been a free state (republic). Modern Bavaria also includes parts of the historical regions of Franconia and Swabia. It is the largest German state by area, forming almost 20% of the total land area of Germany.   #1 - Boys' Band on Parade in Dinkelsbühl Festival Dinkelsbühl is currently
Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 1

Vintage View-Master: Germany (Nations of the World series), reel 1

Ephemera
My recent trip to Cape Cod yielded an unexpected treasure from a local flea market -- a large stash of vintage View-Master reels. Longtime readers of this site will have seen my postings of New Jersey and New York View-Master slides from the 1950s. Up next we hop on a plane (or boat) and head over to Europe to pay a visit to Germany of the early 1960s. Or at least I'm guessing it's the early 1960s. There's no date printed on the reels or the booklet but the latter mentions the Berlin Wall, which was built in 1961. Further, these reels were published by Sawyer's back when they owned View-Master, which was true until they were acquired by the General Aniline & Film (GAF) Corporation in 1966. So there you go. So let's get going already. Here's the first of three reels depicting Germ...
Farewell, Corporal Buckles

Farewell, Corporal Buckles

History, People
America's last living link with World War I is gone. Frank Buckles, the oldest remaining U.S. veteran of the Great War, died yesterday at age 110. Buckles was one of only three remaining veterans of WWI throughout the world. Buckles, born in 1901, enlisted with the U.S. Army in August 1917 after being turned down by the Marine Corps and the Navy. He was only 16 years old but, like many of his era, lied about his age in order to serve his country. In fact, after being rejected by recruiters in his native Kansas, Buckles traveled to Oklahoma City and kept at it until the Army agreed to take him. He was one of more than 4.7 million Americans to sail to Europe as part of the American Expeditionary Forces. Buckles joined the First Fort Riley Casual Detachment and shipped out for England i...
Album cover of the week: Wiegenlied

Album cover of the week: Wiegenlied

Album Cover of the Week, Music
Courtesy of the excellent Arkadin's Ark music blog comes one of the strangest and most disturbing covers I've featured in this series.  It's a 1977 release from German jazz big shot Klaus Lenz and his band.  It's called Wiegenlied (translated to Lullaby), and it was the final album Lenz recorded in East Germany, which he left the following year to go to West Germany. Ah, so quintessentially German, eh?  I'm willing to bet there's all sorts of meaning behind the imagery here, but I have a feeling knowing it would be even more disturbing.
2010: The Gray Flannel Suit Year That Was

2010: The Gray Flannel Suit Year That Was

Blogstuff
It's been another fun year for me in running this site, and I'd like to thank all of you who visit regularly, irregularly, or even once.  I'd also like to thank everyone who has helped by contributing comments and post ideas.  It's good to know there's at least a few people out there who enjoy my little corner of the intertubes.  Since we're in the midst of year-end review season, let's take a quick look back at the posting year that was 2010 for The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. Most Popular Posts This is really what it's all about right?  It's always interesting to me to see what content takes off and what content gets largely ignored.  Since I want to stay positive I'll focus on the former.  So here are the eleven most-popular posts on the site for 2010. #11. Happy Hoff-Day! - Davi
Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Books
It's hard to imagine, especially for those of my generation or younger, but broadcast news was not always a wasteland of vacuous celebrity gossip, shallow political "analysis", or crude sensationalism.  There was in fact a time when the men and women who called themselves broadcast journalists were actually journalists first, broadcasters secondly.  A time when networks valued the insight and knowledge these broadcasters brought, with not nearly as much regard for profit. And for a period of almost 20 years starting in the late 1930s, there was one group of broadcast journalists more insightful, knowledgeable, professional, and popular than all others.  They were the Murrow Boys, started and led by the legendary Edward R. Murrow.  While most people still know his name, the names of the
This Week in History! (February 22-28)

This Week in History! (February 22-28)

History
*February 23, 1927: The Federal Radio Commission (precursor to today's FCC) is created with the passage of the Radio Act of 1927.   President Calvin Coolidge urges the Commission to execute their duties with "all urgent haste", as Howard Stern's first show is only 50 years away. *February 25, 1964: A 22-year-old Olympic champion upstart by the name of Cassius Clay defeats heavyweight boxing champion Sonny Liston by TKO.  Clay changed his name to Muhammad Ali a week later, but I don't care.  His momma name him Clay, I'm gonna call him Clay. *February 24, 1988: With their 8-0 verdict in Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, the United States Supreme Court rules that public figures cannot sue for being made the subject of satire.  The decision clears the final obstacle in the path of Larry
You know something else Hitler ruined?

You know something else Hitler ruined?

Funny Stuff
I'll tell you what - he totally ruined yelling for German people.  Seriously, I can't look at any German getting all foamy at the mouth or maybe even pounding a table without thinking of this: So after all that business with World War II, how can any German politician give a really powerful, emotional speech and not be compared to Hitler?  It doesn't even matter what he's talking about.  He could be going on a rant about something trivial, like his favorite Scorpions song, and if he starts getting too loud all the Germans would be like, "Woah dude, calm down, we don't want to be invaded again or anything." Think I'm exaggerating?  Check out this classic internet meme, the Crazy German Kid: Logic tells you that this kid is just a spaz, but admit it - you were just a little
Book report: The ODESSA File

Book report: The ODESSA File

Books
Having only ever read one other Frederick Forsyth book (his 1971 debut, The Day of the Jackal), I had high hopes for The ODESSA File.  And while it isn't quite the classic that his first novel is, it's a damn fine yarn just the same.  It did prove, without a doubt, that the greatness of Jackal was not a fluke.  Of course, his long and successful career proves that too, but I digress. The story takes place in 1963-64 and centers on a young freelance German reporter, Peter Miller.  Miller drives a flashy car, makes a lot of money, and sleeps with a stripper.  He knows little of the Nazi atrocities committed during World War II and, like many Germans of his generation, really doesn't want to know much. That all changes when, totally by chance, he comes into possession of a diary wri