Tag: GM

Concept Car Capsule: 1955 Chevrolet Biscayne

Concept Car Capsule: 1955 Chevrolet Biscayne

Capsules
Three years before Chevrolet introduced the Biscayne model to its new car lineup, it debuted as a rather interesting concept car design at the 1955 General Motors Motorama car show. It's fascinating for a few reasons. First, it stood in clear contrast to the growing trend of making American cars bigger and flashier. Secondly, it was a curious mix of styles, incorporating aspects of the then-current Corvette with a glimpse of the Corvair to come. Of course, as with the Edsel, your eyes are immediately drawn to the front of the Biscayne. The odd headlamp placement and Jaws-like grill styling were bold, to say the least. The '55 certainly bore precious little resemblance to the production model that rolled off the assembly line in 1958, as you will see in the final image in this gallery. ...
Retrotisements — 1975 Chevrolet New Car and Truck Lineup

Retrotisements — 1975 Chevrolet New Car and Truck Lineup

Featured Posts, Retrotisements
I wouldn't go so far as to say that 1975 was a great year because that's when I was born but it's totally the case. And that's pretty much all the inspiration behind the choice for this car capsule. It features Chevrolet, perhaps the most All-American automotive brand around (sorry Ford fans). Chevy's slogan for the 1975 model year was "Chevrolet Makes Sense for America," which was a recession-themed tagline carried over from the previous year, according to this very in-depth look at Chevy marketing. Their TV ads sported a catchy little jingle titled "Baseball, Hot Dogs, Apple Pie, and Chevrolet." And the '75 Chevy lineup was rather a large one, featuring nearly a dozen passenger cars. And here they are, ads and brochure pages for every Chevy model from the subcompact Vega to...
Now with 15% more words!

Now with 15% more words!

Advertising
By now you've probably seen the ad campaign for Pepsi's so-called "Throwback" soda.  The main selling point is that it's made with real sugar, which of course only serves to point out that their usual product is not (it is of course made with high fructose corn syrup, which is evil, but that's for another time).  (Incidentally, you can also find "Throwback" Mountain Dew and "Heritage" Dr. Pepper for a limited time.) So PepsiCo now finds itself in the awkward position of trying to sell their limited-edition product by making their flagship product seem less desirable or outright inferior by comparison.  After all, any sane person watching an ad touting Throwback Pepsi as being made with real sugar might ask themselves, "So what's in the Pepsi I drink now?  And is it any good?"  It's a bo