Tag: Herbie Hancock

Sunday Jazz: Herbie Hancock, “Wiggle Waggle”

Sunday Jazz: Herbie Hancock, “Wiggle Waggle”

Music, Sunday Jazz
Would you like to add a little funk to your Sunday Jazz? Good, 'cause I'd like to as well. Here's one of the best cuts off of Herbie Hancock's inspired 1969 LP, Fat Albert Rotunda -- "Wiggle Waggle." Instead of blathering on about this excellent disc myself, I'll let AllMusic Guide's Richard Ginell take it from here: Centered around some soundtrack music that Herbie Hancock wrote for Bill Cosby's Fat Albert cartoon show, Fat Albert Rotunda was Hancock's first full-fledged venture into jazz-funk -- and his last until Head Hunters -- making it a prophetic release. At the same time, it was far different in sound from his later funk ventures, concentrating on a romping, late-'60s-vintage R&B-oriented sound. with frequent horn riffs and great rhythmic comping and complex solos from ...
30 for 30 — Our Favorite MTV Music Videos of All-Time

30 for 30 — Our Favorite MTV Music Videos of All-Time

Featured Posts, Music, TV & Radio
It seems like forever since watching videos on MTV was a regular part of our lives, but once upon a time it was. We could go on and on about how the station -- which turns 30 on August 1 -- turned to crap years ago for one reason or another, or about how the "M" in MTV seems to stand for Mook now, but let's not go there. Let's make this post a happy remembrance, one in which we celebrate what was rather than lament what isn't. So in that spirit of celebration, here is a list of our 30 favorite music videos of the MTV era (which kicked off on August 1, 1981). Not the best videos, necessarily, but the ones that had the most impact on us. Oh, and for you ranking junkies -- sorry, this is strictly in alphabetical order. 1. Daft Punk, "Around the World" In college we had a primitiv...
Thank you Hank

Thank you Hank

Music, People
Although I knew this day would come, it doesn't make it any easier to handle.  Hank Jones, the man most responsible for sparking my love of jazz, has died at age 91.  Jones' always tasteful and elegant brand of swing may not have blazed any musical trails, but it always made for good listening. The music was a reflection of the man - gentle, thoughtful with a touch of humor, and never self-important. Jones was the last surviving member of an immensely gifted trio of brothers - Thad (1923-1986) made a name for himself as much for his trumpeting acumen as for his compositional skills, and Elvin (1927-2004) was one of the most respected drummers in the genre.  Hank's understated style made him the least flashy or famous of his brothers, but he was always my favorite. You can find an
Pure jazz for now people

Pure jazz for now people

Listcruft
Patrick Jarenwattananon over at NPR's A Blog Supreme posits a most interesting challenge - name five albums I'd recommend to someone looking to get into jazz.  The twist is that the list needs to made up of recording from the last decade or so, in order to showcase what jazz is about today rather than in its heyday.  In other words, no Kind of Blue or Time Out (even 50th anniversary reissues).  Hmmmmm.... So here's my list in no particular order, in case anyone reading this is looking for one collection of high-quality, contemporary jazz. 1. Robert Glasper, In My Element (Blue Note, 2007) - As much as I do like Glasper's latest offering I think it would be too jarring for someone just getting into jazz.  In My Element showcases Glasper's ability to meld his muscular yet cerebral styl
Album review: Robert Glasper – Double Booked

Album review: Robert Glasper – Double Booked

Music
It is tempting and easy to interpret the meaning behind the track order and title of Robert Glasper's latest album, Double Booked, as being a presentation of the artist's two separate sides - jazz and hip hop/R&B.  Certainly, given that the first half of the record is billed to the Robert Glasper Trio while the second is credited to the Robert Glasper Experiment, that conclusion seems inescapable. But to look at it this way would be to miss the statement that Glasper has been making with his music since his 2003 recorded debut, Mood - jazz, R&B, and hip hop are not disparate elements to be combined or mixed by Glasper for mere novelty or effect; they are both integral and inseparable parts of his artistic vision. It's that vision, combined with his prodigious talent, that mak
1974 – It was a very good year (for music)

1974 – It was a very good year (for music)

Music
According a recent piece on cnn.com, 1974 was a really bad year for music. Like, really bad. As some examples, the author cites the following examples of musical craptasticity: Terry Jacks' "Seasons in the Sun," Cher's "Dark Lady," Ray Stevens' "The Streak," Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods' "Billy, Don't Be a Hero," John Denver's "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" and "Annie's Song," Paper Lace's "The Night Chicago Died," Paul Anka's "(You're) Having My Baby," Olivia Newton-John's "I Honestly Love You" and Carl Douglas' "Kung Fu Fighting." Looking at that list, I would be inclined to agree with the author's assertion that 1974 was a dry, rocky place where the seeds of quality could find no purchase. But the problem with the article is this - there was PLENTY of great music being produced in 19...