Tag: Horror

13 Classic Horror Movie Posters from the 1950s

13 Classic Horror Movie Posters from the 1950s

Ephemera, Movies
To be honest, I couldn't even tell you of these classic 1950s horror movies are any good. But I can say with certainty that their posters are. So to celebrate beautiful design, and one of the golden ages of American horror cinema, here is a gallery of 13 classic horror movie posters from the 1950s. Gaze upon them if you dare... And once you're done with these, check out my other poster galleries for '80s horror movies, juvenile delinquent movies, and '50s sci-fi movies.
Here’s a Set of Neat Halloween III: Season of the Witch Lobby Cards

Here’s a Set of Neat Halloween III: Season of the Witch Lobby Cards

Ephemera, Movies
When Halloween III: Season of the Witch was released in October 1982, fans of the horror series were no doubt surprised at the total lack of Michael Myers. That and anything resembling a good story. But all you needed to do was look at any of these lobby cards for the film to know that this would be very much unlike the first two Halloween flicks. Turns out that masks, old men, and dudes in business suits aren't the crucial ingredients for a classic horror movie. Who knew? Still, that Silver Shamrock tune is so very catchy.
GFS Home Movies — Halloween III: Season of the Witch

GFS Home Movies — Halloween III: Season of the Witch

Movies
To understand just how large a failure Halloween III: Season of the Witch was, first consider the premise. An evil scientist/company owner seeks to use a vaguely mystical and ancient pagan technology to kill millions of children wearing Halloween masks. Now say that out loud. Sounds awful, doesn't it? And yet this was the story that John Carpenter and Debra Hill ostensibly signed off on for the third installment in Carpenter's legendary Halloween horror series. Look, bonus points to Carpenter and Hill for boldly moving away from what was already becoming a tired genre -- the slasher film. It's hard to imagine now, but their 1978 original was just that -- original. And the sequel, while not nearly as groundbreaking, was almost as good. But by 1982 it was already clear that Hollywood stud
Check Out This Awesome Deleted Scene from Halloween (1978)

Check Out This Awesome Deleted Scene from Halloween (1978)

Internet, Movies
Fans of the horror classic Halloween have noted quite a few inconsistencies over the years. Like, why are the trees full of green leaves in Illinois during late October? Why do all the cars have California plates? And most importantly, how the hell did Michael Myers learn to drive a car when he's been locked inside Smith's Grove Sanitarium since he was 6 years old? Well thanks to Adam Green of ArieScope Pictures, now we know. Turns out there's a deleted scene that explains the whole thing. Check it out: Nice. Oh and how cool is it that Michael is played by Kane Hodder, who also played Jason Voorhees in four Friday the 13th films? Very cool indeed.
Trailer Trash: Wild, Wild Planet

Trailer Trash: Wild, Wild Planet

Movies
I stumbled across this crazy-ass science fiction film while I was researching wire photos for my Facebook page. It's called Wild, Wild Planet and it looks absolutely terrible in the best way possible. The movie was released in Italy 1965 (where it was called I Criminali della Galassia) but has a definite '50s vibe about it. The trailer bills it as the first space horror movie, which is something to hang your hat on I guess. I have no idea what the hell is going on here, and I suspect that watching the full movie would be even more confusing. There's some people with four arms, and then there's some really strong women who can kick ass. There's also an attempt to merge a man and a woman into something called a "bi sapien," which is a dumb name because that translates roughly t
20 Great Horror Movie Posters from the 1980s

20 Great Horror Movie Posters from the 1980s

Ephemera, Featured Posts, Movies
#1. Cheerleader Camp (1988) #2. April Fool's Day (1986) #3. Slaughter High (1986) #4. Blood Beach (1981) #5. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) #6. Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) #7. Happy Birthday to Me (1981) #8. The Mutilator (1985) #9. The Evil Dead (1981) #10. Future-Kill (1985) #11. The Stuff (1985) #12. Friday the 13th (1980) #13. Fright Night (1985) #14. Day of the Dead (1985) #15. Mother's Day (1980) #16. The Fog (1980) #17. Trick or Treat (1986) #18. Berserker (1987) #19. The Gates of Hell (1983) #20. Hell Night (1981)
Retrotisements: Halloween (1978) U.S. and Foreign Movie Posters

Retrotisements: Halloween (1978) U.S. and Foreign Movie Posters

Featured Posts, Retrotisements
This piece originally ran in October 2008. I've republished it because, really, this should run annually. But to show I'm not just being lazy, I've added posters from Denmark and Italy below! October 25 marks a momentous day in horror history — the 30th anniversary of the release of John Carpenter's slasher classic Halloween.  While it certainly wasn't the first horror film on the block, it is one of the best and most influential. I and many other fans of classic horror consider it to be part of the holy trinity of the genre, alongside Friday the 13th (1980) and A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984). In retrospect, it seems like such a simple concept that it's hard to believe it hadn't been fully explored before. A psychopath is on the loose in the streets of a quiet, suburban town (Haddo
Still scary after all these years – Stephen King’s It

Still scary after all these years – Stephen King’s It

Books
In celebration of It's 25th anniversary on September 15th, 2011 I'm reposting this review I wrote in April 2007. - Chris I am not what you could call a voracious reader. I can barely make it through an issue of Highlights for Children without getting distracted by something or other. So when I can make it through a 1,000+ page book, it's quite a feat. When I consciously choose to re-read the same 1,000+ page book, it's nothing short of a miracle. I recently finished reading Stephen King's It for the second time, and I think I enjoyed it even more than the first (which was probably about 15 years ago). I know a lot of literary snobs look down their large and bespectacled noses at King, but let's face it, the man delivers. I'd read about the Losers and Pennywise the Clown any day o...