Tag: Indiana

Retrotisements: The Early Days of Kentucky Fried Chicken

Retrotisements: The Early Days of Kentucky Fried Chicken

Retrotisements
One of the many things that makes Kentucky Fried Chicken unique in fast food history is that its growth as a powerhouse franchise was not quite as direct as, say, McDonald's. For one thing, the chain began not as a dedicated franchise location but rather as a menu of items out of a regular restaurant. In this case, KFC was essentially born in a pair of motels/restaurants in Asheville, North Carolina and Corbin, Kentucky. Colonel Harland Sanders, who owned both in the 1930s, rebuilt his Corbin location as a motel with a 140-seat restaurant after a fire struck in late 1939. Here is a June 1940 newspaper ad for the Sanders Court & Café, published in the Asheville Citizen Times. Note how there is no reference to chicken: The first Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise opened on Septem
Film at 11: A Gallery of Vintage TV News Program Ads

Film at 11: A Gallery of Vintage TV News Program Ads

Ephemera, TV & Radio
Sometimes I know that a post I'm putting together is destined to get 20 views if I'm lucky. But I have to follow my muse wherever she may lead me, and today she leads me to TV newsrooms across the country. I can't say exactly why, but I find these old advertisements for network TV news programs to be just so... quaint? Charming? I don't quite know how to put it. I just love how much these ads convey what it must have been like to watch the news back in the day -- not slick in the least. Just a bunch of square white men (and sometimes white women) reading the day's events. And now the news of the 1950s, '60s, and '70s...  
Sports Graveyard: Indianapolis Capitols

Sports Graveyard: Indianapolis Capitols

Football Friday, Sports
I ran across this interesting pin while looking for old sports memorabilia, and was immediately intrigued. The only football team I ever thought called Indianapolis home is the Colts. So who were the Indianapolis Caps? Turns out the Caps -- actually the Indianapolis Capitols -- were a member of the short-lived Continental Football League. The CFL began play in 1965, five seasons after the American Football League, and folded after the 1969 season. The Caps joined the league in 1966 as the Montreal Beavers before moving to Indiana two years later. In their first year in Indianapolis, the Caps won the Central Division with an 8-4 record. They repeated that record in the league's final season, but managed to also win the last-ever CFL championship by beating the San Antonio Toros. ...
Notre Dame Fans Need Help Getting Drunk

Notre Dame Fans Need Help Getting Drunk

Blogstuff
Just when I think I've seen all the weirdest search terms people have entered in finding this site, there are always more every day. Here are some of my favorite recent ones, along with the posts those search phrases found. “Where can I buy Cella wine in South Bend Indiana?” -- I wouldn't have the first clue, but you can check out this vintage Cella Winery commercial from 1982 in the meantime. "josh radnor douche" -- Maybe he is, not that I've met the man. Remember kids, when you watch a TV show you're usually watching a character, not a real person. "Alien tornádó" -- I have no idea how that term brought someone to my post of old car ads. Apparently there is a Syfy Channel movie called Alien Tornado that looks predictably horrible. "phife dawg net worth" -- While I'm much more e
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 7 — Early 20th Century Cars

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 7 — Early 20th Century Cars

Vintage Photo Wednesday
From Wikipedia: The Haynes Automobile Company was a United States automobile manufacturing company, which produced automobiles in Kokomo, Indiana, from 1905 to 1924. The company was related to the Haynes-Apperson company, which produced automobiles from 1896-1905. Co-founder Elwood Haynes changed the name of the company after fellow co-founders Elmer and Edgar Apperson left to form the Apperson Automobile Company. From Wikipedia: The Stanley Motor Carriage Company was an American manufacturer of steam-engine vehicles; it operated from 1902 to 1924. The cars made by the company were colloquially called Stanley Steamers, although several different models were produced. The 8-96 is also known as the Buick Victoria. From Wikipedia: Chalmers Motor Car Company...
The 10 Deadliest Tornadoes in World History

The 10 Deadliest Tornadoes in World History

Featured Posts, Listcruft
In spite of all our technological advancements and so-called human ingenuity, we are ever at Mother Nature's mercy. 2011's deadly tornado in Joplin, Missouri -- just one of many to strike the American Midwest that weekend -- is a stark reminder of that fact. In total, more than 1,000 tornadoes touched down in the U.S. in April 2011 -- the most active month on record. But while the U.S. is home to the most tornadoes on a yearly basis, advances in research and early detection have helped reduce the number of fatalities from twisters. As a result, the list of the 20 deadliest tornadoes (or tornado outbreaks) ever contains just five from the United States. Here are the full top ten. Some of these totals are estimates of course, owing to time or lack of properly published information. #1: D
New Adventures in Hi-Fi: My Journey Into R.E.M., Part 3

New Adventures in Hi-Fi: My Journey Into R.E.M., Part 3

Music
It seems like a totally foreign concept now, but there was a time when bands managed to tour and release albums on a regular basis. An album per year was standard for most acts, and some overachievers managed two per year. Now fans are lucky to get a new record every three years or so. I don't know how this started or why, but it sucks. I'd rather get a new release every year, with eight or nine songs, than these 14 or 15-song monstrosities that come out whenever a band gets around to it. Anyway, we're knee-deep in my journey through R.E.M.'s discography in case you hadn't noticed. They kept up an old-school release schedule throughout the 1980s, with a new studio recording every year from 1982 through 1988. Pretty damn impressive if you ask me. We're up to LP number three right now, Fa...