Tag: Jazz fusion

Sunday Jazz: Let’s Talk About the PolCat Album

Sunday Jazz: Let’s Talk About the PolCat Album

Music, Sunday Jazz
I see at least half a dozen PR emails a day concerning albums and projects I have little interest in. So it figures that I missed the February release of PolCat, the debut album from a project featuring Chris Poland, one of my all-time favorite guitarists. The name, I'm certain, comes from Poland and tenor saxophonist Frank Catalano, who make up half of this astoundingly talented quartet. How I stumbled upon this album is not important -- I'm just glad I did. It's one of the freshest, most enjoyable releases of any genre I've heard this year, and hopefully points the way to more output from this group. I haven't heard much of anything from Catalano prior to this album, but his sax playing is agile and tuneful. Likewise, the rhythm section of bassist Sean O’Bryan Smith and drummer
Sunday Jazz: Andy Summers, “The Three Marias”

Sunday Jazz: Andy Summers, “The Three Marias”

Music, Sunday Jazz
While Sting got all the attention (and record sales) after the Police broke up in the mid-1980s, I've always found guitarist Andy Summers' solo material to be more consistently satisfying. And the one album of his I love more than any other is 1997's The Last Dance of Mr. X. Summers is backed by a crack unit including Tony Levin on bass and Gregg Bissonette on drums. The trio crackles with energy on "The Three Marias," the second track on the album. Enjoy! (listen to "The Three Marias" by Andy Summers) And because I know you're curious, here's a live performance of "The Three Marias" by Wayne Shorter, recorded in 1995. The original version can be found on his 1985 solo LP, Atlantis. (Spotify users — you can listen to these and other featured Sunday Jazz songs by subscribing to
Sunday Jazz: Brand X, “Running on Three”

Sunday Jazz: Brand X, “Running on Three”

Music, Sunday Jazz
A lot of jazz fans cringe at the mere mention of the term "jazz fusion," and I can understand why. What started out in the late 1960s as an exciting blend of jazz's looser structure and penchant for improvisation with rock's raw power turned to utter crap by the end of the '70s. But there's a lot of great fusion out there, waiting to be discovered. And so today I present one of my favorite fusion groups -- Brand X. The talent in Brand X was staggering. The core group of John Goodsall (guitar), Percy Jones (bass), Robin Lumley (keyboards), and Phil Collins (drums, of course) released some fantastic music in the mid to late '70s. Their debut record, Unorthodox Behaviour, is quite simply one of the best examples of jazz fusion at its peak. So fusion lovers and fusion haters alike, feast...