Tag: journalism

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Internet, Links
Here’s a fresh batch of some quality interweb finds I’ve come across over the last 7 days or so:  You've read endless commentary on the Miami University football booster scandal involving Nevin Shapiro, why not read the original investigation by Charles Robinson? (Yahoo! Sports) A very cool photo gallery by Natsumi Hayashi, the "levitating girl" from Tokyo (Geekologie) Will Google+ be able to unseat Flickr as the premiere destination for photographers on the web? (TechCrunch) A fascinating gallery of photographs taken by the East German Stasi (secret police) during the Cold War era. (Conscientious Extended) You'd swear this article on the role of police patrols and the impact of broken windows in a neighborhood wasn't written almost 30 years ago, it's so relevant (The Atlan
Serene Branson’s scary post-Grammy moment

Serene Branson’s scary post-Grammy moment

TV & Radio
I love it when TV newspeople can't control their mouths on air (I'm looking at you, Sue Simmons and Ernie Anastos!), but this is just scary. During a post-Grammy backstage piece on last night's CBS Los Angeles news broadcast, Serene Branson looked for all the world to suffer a stroke mid-sentence. Seriously, this clip goes from funny to frightening really quickly. That's fear in that woman's eyes as she struggles to figure out what the hell is happening to her. Branson was admitted to the hospital, and I guess we'll find out what happened soon. So to lighten the mood a bit let's keep fucking that chicken, Ernie! Related articles Serene Branson: The Sun changes its story - but not the URL (onlinejournalismblog.com) Concern for Channel 2's Serene Branson (laobserved.com)...
Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Books
It's hard to imagine, especially for those of my generation or younger, but broadcast news was not always a wasteland of vacuous celebrity gossip, shallow political "analysis", or crude sensationalism.  There was in fact a time when the men and women who called themselves broadcast journalists were actually journalists first, broadcasters secondly.  A time when networks valued the insight and knowledge these broadcasters brought, with not nearly as much regard for profit. And for a period of almost 20 years starting in the late 1930s, there was one group of broadcast journalists more insightful, knowledgeable, professional, and popular than all others.  They were the Murrow Boys, started and led by the legendary Edward R. Murrow.  While most people still know his name, the names of the