Tag: Judas Priest

Deep Cuts: Judas Priest

Deep Cuts: Judas Priest

Music
You don't even have to be a heavy metal fan to know who Judas Priest is. Over the past several decades, they've cemented their status as metal legends time and time again. This year marks the kickoff of the band's Epitaph World Tour, stated to be the last Judas Priest world tour ever. Who knows if that's really true (KISS, anyone?), but now seems as good a time as any to examine the band's lengthy discography and pick out a few hidden treasures. 1. "Burnin' Up" (Killing Machine/Hell Bent for Leather, 1978) -- By the late '70s the Priest had largely moved on from more complex song structures and the occasional foray into metal balladry. Few songs from this period typify the band's more streamlined approach than "Burnin' Up," a musically muscular and lyrically charged slice of metal. ...
Listening booth — Judas Priest, “Sinner”

Listening booth — Judas Priest, “Sinner”

Listening Booth, Music
It is a sad day in the metal world, as K.K. Downing of Judas Priest has retired from the band. I was totally psyched to see them on their Epitaph World Tour, as it's supposed to be the last one. He will be replaced on the tour by Richie Faulkner. No offense to Richie, but now I'm less excited. Anyway, K.K. leaves behind a legacy as one-half of an all-time great guitar duo (with Glenn Tipton). There are so many great Downing moments to choose from, but I have to go with one of my favorite Priest songs ever. This is the lead track from 1977's Sin After Sin, "Sinner." That lead break and solo are Kenneth Downing at his best my friends. Raise your devil horns and bang your heads in tribute to one of the best ever.
Cross-pollination: My old-school metal mixtape on Popdose!

Cross-pollination: My old-school metal mixtape on Popdose!

Blogstuff
My last Popdose mixtape (five-star jazz) seemed to go over pretty well on Popdose, so I thought I'd mix it up this time and delve into my first true love -- heavy metal. This mixtape focuses on the metal that was burned into my brain during its formative years. So it should come as no surprise that I included Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, and Metallica among others. So bust out that denim jacket and head over to Popdose now to check out my metal mix. Because it's what Dio would want you to do. But just before you do, as a super-special bonus here's one of the tracks that very nearly made the cut. It's the first track from Anthrax's blistering 1990 album Persistence of Time -- "Time."
Platters that matter: 20 albums that changed my life (#10—#1)

Platters that matter: 20 albums that changed my life (#10—#1)

Listcruft, Music
At long last, I present the conclusion of my list of 20 albums that have had the most impact on me and my love of music. For a brief refresher, you can check the back half of the top 20 here. But for your convenience, here's the list: #20 — Queen, The Game #19 — Seals & Crofts, Summer Breeze #18 — Kiss, Creatures of the Night #17 — Iron Maiden, The Number of the Beast #16 — Run-D.M.C., Raising Hell #15 — Kiss, Alive! #14 — Rush, A Farewell to Kings #13 — Miles Davis, Kind of Blue #12 — Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Pictures at an Exhibition #11 — various artists, Jazz Master Files OK, now that we're all caught up, let's finish this thing already. As a reminder, this is no particular order but I know people love countdowns so there you go. #10 — Genesis, Duke If Rus
Album review: Spinal Tap – Back From the Dead

Album review: Spinal Tap – Back From the Dead

Music
I don't think I could ever get tired of watching the 1984 mockumentary classic, This Is Spinal Tap, or listening to the accompanying soundtrack.  That movie and, more importantly, its music perfectly straddled the fine line between brutal satire and straight-laced performance.  It's this quality that spawned not only legions of fans for a fictitious band but more awesomely the legendary tale about the Scorpions storming out of a screening of the movie because the parody hit a little too close to home. It's as if Spinal Tap (Christopher Guest, Harry Shearer, and Michael McKean) and director/co-writer Rob Reiner gazed into a crystal ball and saw just what a joke the heavy metal genre would become by the end of the decade, which makes the movie and songs even better after the fact.  But wh
“A gut wrenching day for The ClayNation”

“A gut wrenching day for The ClayNation”

People
I'll start off by stating that I don't care that Clay Aiken has finally decided to let us in on the painfully obvious - he's gay.  I'm offended not by his sexual orientation (I am a huge fan of Queen and Judas Priest after all), but rather by his mediocre and boring music.  But while Aiken's revelation met with a resounding "meh" from most of the American public, there is a subset of the population - self-titled ClayMates - who have had a hard time keeping the old stiff upper lip, as it were. Here's a sampling of dispatches from deep inside ClayNation - The Clayboard forums.  Read and weep, my friends: "This is a gut wrenching day for The ClayNation. Somebody wake me up, I hope its a dream." - strollynn63 "I wish him well and hope he gets some peace of mind now BUT I feel he lied to
Album cover of the week: British Steel

Album cover of the week: British Steel

Album Cover of the Week
As we approach this most American of holidays this week, I thought I'd throw a curveball and present the cover from one of the quintessential albums of the so-called New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. Released in April 1980, Judas Priest's British Steel is one of the seminal albums of heavy metal. The music is reflective of the cover art -- brutally simple and simply brutal. The group had been refining its approach since their 1974 debut, Rocka Rolla. Gone were the slow-building gems and gentle numbers from albums like Sad Wings of Destiny and Killing Machine (aka Hell Bent for Leather in the U.S.). In its place are nine slabs of vintage headbanging glory, such as "Breaking the Law", "Metal Gods", and "Living After Midnight". Scott Ian commented on the record title whe...
A Loving Tribute to “Slave to the Metal”

A Loving Tribute to “Slave to the Metal”

Music
In the days before CD players, iPods and file sharing services became a part of everyday life (aka The Dark Ages), the mix tape was an essential part of a music lover's life. There were two varieties of mix tapes - homemade (for yourself or some girlfriend/boyfriend whose name you can't even remember anymore) and store-bought. Store-bought mix tapes (known in the industry as "compilations") were superior in two ways - they exposed you to bands you might have never heard before, and they didn't take five hours to put together on your crappy home stereo. During a road trip from New Jersey to Florida in the mid-'80s, I purchased my first mix tape at a Stuckey's in South Carolina. Or maybe it was North Carolina. No, it was South Carolina. Maybe Georgia. Anyway, being a proud metal he...