Tag: Kentucky

Retrotisements: The Early Days of Kentucky Fried Chicken

Retrotisements: The Early Days of Kentucky Fried Chicken

Retrotisements
One of the many things that makes Kentucky Fried Chicken unique in fast food history is that its growth as a powerhouse franchise was not quite as direct as, say, McDonald's. For one thing, the chain began not as a dedicated franchise location but rather as a menu of items out of a regular restaurant. In this case, KFC was essentially born in a pair of motels/restaurants in Asheville, North Carolina and Corbin, Kentucky. Colonel Harland Sanders, who owned both in the 1930s, rebuilt his Corbin location as a motel with a 140-seat restaurant after a fire struck in late 1939. Here is a June 1940 newspaper ad for the Sanders Court & Café, published in the Asheville Citizen Times. Note how there is no reference to chicken: The first Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise opened on Septem
Don’t Touch That Dial #2: Zorro, 1967

Don’t Touch That Dial #2: Zorro, 1967

Advertising, TV & Radio
The original Disney-produced TV series Zorro (starring Guy Williams) ran from 1957-59, but a decade after its debut on ABC it still had life in reruns. This ad for the show ran in 1967 and shows us that it was airing on WKYT-TV (channel 27) out of Lexington, Kentucky. The station started out as a CBS affiliate, switched to ABC in 1958, and moved back to CBS in 1968.
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 39: M3 Tank and Crew Using Small Arms, Ft. Knox, Ky., 1942

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 39: M3 Tank and Crew Using Small Arms, Ft. Knox, Ky., 1942

Vintage Photo Wednesday
Now here's a peach of a color photograph from the World War II era. It captures a training exercise for the U.S. Army at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Here we see six soldiers aiming their firearms at an unseen target, all the while in the shadow of a Medium Tank M3. Note the rather unique offset turret indicative of the M3 tank, which was discontinued at the end of 1942 in favor of the iconic M4 Sherman. Click for a larger version. I'm no firearms expert, but the soldier in the front left looks to be holding a Thompson M1 submachine gun with drum magazine.
Album Cover of the Week: For Twisters Only

Album Cover of the Week: For Twisters Only

Album Cover of the Week, Music
If there has ever been artists to get a ton of mileage out of one song, it's Chubby Checker and "The Twist." Yeah I know he had other hits in the '60s, but Checker hasn't been able to milk "Pony Time" for everything from song sequels to ads for Oreo cookies and the Social Security Administration. Today's featured album cover comes from Checker's commercial prime. It's a 1961 covers album entitled For Twisters Only, and it was clearly meant to capitalize on his biggest song, which had hit #1 in 1960. Surprisingly this LP (Parkway Records, P 7002) did not contain "The Twist" at all, but rather a host of hits from the '50s such as "Hound Dog," "Rock Around the Clock," and "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On." Graphically this is primitive but appealing. There's the obvious choice of a ...
The 10 Deadliest Tornadoes in World History

The 10 Deadliest Tornadoes in World History

Featured Posts, Listcruft
In spite of all our technological advancements and so-called human ingenuity, we are ever at Mother Nature's mercy. 2011's deadly tornado in Joplin, Missouri -- just one of many to strike the American Midwest that weekend -- is a stark reminder of that fact. In total, more than 1,000 tornadoes touched down in the U.S. in April 2011 -- the most active month on record. But while the U.S. is home to the most tornadoes on a yearly basis, advances in research and early detection have helped reduce the number of fatalities from twisters. As a result, the list of the 20 deadliest tornadoes (or tornado outbreaks) ever contains just five from the United States. Here are the full top ten. Some of these totals are estimates of course, owing to time or lack of properly published information. #1: D