Tag: labor

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 22: Hudson Tunnel Station Newsies, 1909

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 22: Hudson Tunnel Station Newsies, 1909

Vintage Photo Wednesday
Starting this week I'm going to start featuring more vintage photographs from my home state of New Jersey -- the good, the bad, and the just plain neat. It's a great opportunity for me to both share and learn more about the Garden State, so save your mob/pollution jokes please. As with most of the other photos I've shared, I'm going to attempt to clean things up a bit. I'm no Shorpy but I do what I can. This week's image was taken by Lewis Wickes Hine, who shot countless numbers of pictures depicting child labor at the turn of the century and later. This photo shows a group of newsies hawking papers at the Hudson Tunnel Station in Jersey City in December 1909. From the Library of Congress page description: "Newsie selling at the Hudson Tunnel Station, Jersey City. Boy on left is Patr...
Time Capsule: Vintage Detroit Car Maker World War II Production Photos

Time Capsule: Vintage Detroit Car Maker World War II Production Photos

Capsules, History
As part of a larger story in its August 17, 1942 issue on strife within between Detroit's car makers and their labor union member workers, Life magazine captured some excellent photographs of Motor City manufacturers in the midst of wartime production. The pictures, taken by staff photographer William Vandivert, captured a rare moment in modern American history -- when the nation's vast commercial manufacturing muscle was flexed to produce machinery (planes and bombers) for World War II. Seen here are images from Ford, Chrysler, and Chevrolet plants in Detroit, Michigan. Click on any photo for a larger version. (more…)
Save your anger, NFL fans. No one cares.

Save your anger, NFL fans. No one cares.

Sports
The last thing the internet needs is another screed about the NFL lockout, but here's mine anyway. I'm not really interested in taking sides in the toxic blame game that the NFL owners (via their squirrely mouthpiece, Roger Goodell) and the NFLPA have been engaged in for weeks. What I'm more interested in is the fans who choose to take sides, and why they do so. At this point most of the resentment seems to be aimed squarely at the league's 32 owners. They're greedy, they're just trying to screw the poor, subjugated players, they're killing the golden goose, blah blah blah. I'm not defending the owners or how they've conducted themselves throughout this whole sordid affair. But neither can I get myself whipped up into a frenzy over what they're doing. Because I recognize them for wha...
Game Off! — A brief history of NFL labor strife

Game Off! — A brief history of NFL labor strife

Sports
As football fans across the country sweat out the days leading up to the March 3 expiration of the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between the NFL and the NFL Players Association, it's worth pointing out that work stoppages are nothing new for the league. In fact they've occurred multiple times in its long history. Here's a brief primer on the history of National Football League work stoppages. 1960s — Players weak, owners strong Although the NFL/AFL merger was fait accompli by 1968, the players in the two leagues continued to be represented by separate associations. This left the NFLPA in a position of weakness when presenting demands related to pensions and paychecks, among other items, and they voted on July 3, 1968 to strike. In response the league essentially said, "You can't