Tag: Law

More Posters of the WPA (Works Progress Administration)

More Posters of the WPA (Works Progress Administration)

Ephemera, Featured Posts
Just when you thought you'd seen the last (well, only) gallery of posters from the Works Progress Administration, BAM! Here comes another one, only four years later. According to Wikipedia, the WPA was the largest and most ambitious of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal agencies, employing millions of workers to carry out public works projects. Agency workers constructed public buildings and roads, and operated large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. Nearly every community in the United States had a park, bridge or school constructed by the agency, which especially benefited rural and Western areas. The budget at the outset of the WPA in 1935 was $1.4 billion a year (about 6.7 percent of the 1935 GDP), and in total it spent $13.4 billion. That's all well and g...
Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Internet, Links
Here’s a fresh batch of some quality interweb finds I’ve come across over the last 7 days or so:  You've read endless commentary on the Miami University football booster scandal involving Nevin Shapiro, why not read the original investigation by Charles Robinson? (Yahoo! Sports) A very cool photo gallery by Natsumi Hayashi, the "levitating girl" from Tokyo (Geekologie) Will Google+ be able to unseat Flickr as the premiere destination for photographers on the web? (TechCrunch) A fascinating gallery of photographs taken by the East German Stasi (secret police) during the Cold War era. (Conscientious Extended) You'd swear this article on the role of police patrols and the impact of broken windows in a neighborhood wasn't written almost 30 years ago, it's so relevant (The Atlan
Game Off! — A brief history of NFL labor strife

Game Off! — A brief history of NFL labor strife

Sports
As football fans across the country sweat out the days leading up to the March 3 expiration of the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between the NFL and the NFL Players Association, it's worth pointing out that work stoppages are nothing new for the league. In fact they've occurred multiple times in its long history. Here's a brief primer on the history of National Football League work stoppages. 1960s — Players weak, owners strong Although the NFL/AFL merger was fait accompli by 1968, the players in the two leagues continued to be represented by separate associations. This left the NFLPA in a position of weakness when presenting demands related to pensions and paychecks, among other items, and they voted on July 3, 1968 to strike. In response the league essentially said, "You can't
This Week in History! (February 22-28)

This Week in History! (February 22-28)

History
*February 23, 1927: The Federal Radio Commission (precursor to today's FCC) is created with the passage of the Radio Act of 1927.   President Calvin Coolidge urges the Commission to execute their duties with "all urgent haste", as Howard Stern's first show is only 50 years away. *February 25, 1964: A 22-year-old Olympic champion upstart by the name of Cassius Clay defeats heavyweight boxing champion Sonny Liston by TKO.  Clay changed his name to Muhammad Ali a week later, but I don't care.  His momma name him Clay, I'm gonna call him Clay. *February 24, 1988: With their 8-0 verdict in Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, the United States Supreme Court rules that public figures cannot sue for being made the subject of satire.  The decision clears the final obstacle in the path of Larry
And the idiot of the week is…

And the idiot of the week is…

Funny Stuff, People
District Judge Robert Patterson Jr., who admitted (without embarrassment, presumably) that he found the "magical world" of the Harry Potter book series "hard to follow, filled with strange names and words that would be gibberish in any other context." (Judge Patterson, by the way, presided over the recently concluded copyright trial involving J.K. Rowling and RDR Books, would-be publishers of the Harry Potter Lexicon.) Now this is a first - an adult actually claiming that Harry Potter is too confusing. And not just any adult, but one who presumably graduated from law school at some point and is capable of reading and comprehending rather complex legal briefs and literature. And a quick check reveals that, indeed, the Hon. Judge Patterson graduated from Harvard and Columbia Law. Of cours...