Tag: Led Zeppelin

My favorite music: 1983

My favorite music: 1983

Music
If there's one thing the internet lacks, it's pointless music lists. So to fill that void, here's a sampling of my favorite albums from some random year. Let's say, 1983. (Spotify users, check out the accompanying playlist and subscribe!) Robert Plant, The Principle of Moments -- While I would in no way claim that Robert Plant's solo output bests Led Zeppelin's music, a lot of times I simply prefer to listen to Plant. In fact I'd say that Plant has enjoyed one of the most artistically rewarding solo careers of any artist who was part of a popular band that I can think of. The Principle of Moments is probably my favorite Plant solo effort (next to Fate of Nations) -- he sounds freed from the constraints of creating larger-than-life rock and the music just crackles with energy. "In the...
So fresh — 10 Led Zeppelin songs that will never get old

So fresh — 10 Led Zeppelin songs that will never get old

Music
If you listen to classic rock radio enough, you'd think that the only songs Led Zeppelin recorded were "The Ocean, "Whole Lotta Love," or "Over the Hills and Far Away." As much as I love those songs, enough already. The good news is that despite a lot of Zep's catalog being way overexposed, plenty of their songs still sound fresh to this day. So here's a list of 10 Led Zeppelin cuts that will never, ever get old. 1 -- "Poor Tom" (from Coda, 1982) It's hard to imagine Led Zeppelin III being any better, but this track (recorded during those sessions) would've done just that. Above all else -- Robert Plant's understated vocals or Jimmy Page's delicate acoustic guitar -- John Bonham's ridiculously bouncy drumming makes this track. 2 -- "Communication Breakdown" (from Led Ze...
Deep Cuts: Judas Priest

Deep Cuts: Judas Priest

Music
You don't even have to be a heavy metal fan to know who Judas Priest is. Over the past several decades, they've cemented their status as metal legends time and time again. This year marks the kickoff of the band's Epitaph World Tour, stated to be the last Judas Priest world tour ever. Who knows if that's really true (KISS, anyone?), but now seems as good a time as any to examine the band's lengthy discography and pick out a few hidden treasures. 1. "Burnin' Up" (Killing Machine/Hell Bent for Leather, 1978) -- By the late '70s the Priest had largely moved on from more complex song structures and the occasional foray into metal balladry. Few songs from this period typify the band's more streamlined approach than "Burnin' Up," a musically muscular and lyrically charged slice of metal. ...
Venture Bros. wrapup: “Any Which Way But Zeus”

Venture Bros. wrapup: “Any Which Way But Zeus”

TV & Radio
One of the ways you can gauge the strength of a show's is not how well they produce original plots and storylines, but how they rework old tropes into an entertaining package.  It's sort of like how Led Zeppelin made the blues into something you didn't have to force yourself to enjoy.  The Venture Brothers did much the same in its first season by repackaging a litany of hackneyed cartoon plots from the '60s and '70s into a wholly fresh enterprise.  Jackson Publick and Doc Hammer migrated away from that more obtuse approach as the series progressed, preferring instead to develop a more intricate, original mythology. Every once in awhile, however, Doc and Jackson kick it old school and produce a self-contained story that feels more like a fun one-off than a very important episode.  "A
New release roundup (feat. Midlake, Stone Temple Pilots, and Maya Beiser)

New release roundup (feat. Midlake, Stone Temple Pilots, and Maya Beiser)

Music
Sigh.  Once again there's so much music and so little time.  In fact, most of albums on this list can't properly be considered "new" anymore, but that's life. Dave King - Indelicate (Sunnyside Records) King has already established himself as a jazz percussionist par excellence with the Bad Plus and Happy Apple, but here he decides to carry the entire load himself.   While I'd love to say that Indelicate is a prime example of a talented artist finally allowed to break free from the shackles of the group format, that isn't really the case here.  King's muscular and primal rhythmic approach to the drum kit carries over to the piano but it becomes clear fairly quickly that while King has a number of good ideas (among them the simple but engaging "Homage: Young People" and the bouncy "I
Listening Booth – Robert Plant, “Big Log”

Listening Booth – Robert Plant, “Big Log”

Listening Booth, Music
It didn't take Robert Plant long after the breakup of Led Zeppelin to find his musical footing.  From his superb 1983 sophomore effort, The Principle of Moments, here's "Big Log".  The song reached the Top 20 in both the U.S. and U.K., and the video complements it perfectly. To this day "Big Log" is my favorite Plant track, helped in no small measure by the top-rate guitar playing of Robbie Blunt.  Blunt left Plant's band in 1985 and has kept a pretty low profile since, doing occasional session work for various artists.
Exit Robert Plant, enter…

Exit Robert Plant, enter…

Music
The proof, as they say, is in the pudding but the current word out of the Led Zeppelin camp is that the group (co-founders Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, as well as new drummer Jason Bonham) don't much feel like waiting around for Robert Plant anymore and will take to the road without him. Jones also stated that this new singer will not simply be a Plant sound-alike, in order to avoid seeming like a tribute band.  So the big question is: Who will be the one to step into Plant's skin-tight bell bottoms?  While the safe choice would be someone with some strong pipes and a decent hard rock pedigree (but not necessarily a big name), a new contest by the good people at Popdose has given me inspiration to think outside the proverbial box. So indulge me for a moment, while I spitball a few
Meme time: Pick an album for every year you’ve been alive

Meme time: Pick an album for every year you’ve been alive

Music
From Idolator via the AV Club comes a pretty cool music meme - compile a list of your favorite albums, with one for each year you've been alive. Sounds easy enough, but some years are positively stacked with music I love.  Forcing me to choose among my musical children is just so...cruel. For me the most bountiful years were 1975-1978, 1980, 1982-1984, 1990, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2006, and 2007. 1975 - Kiss, Alive! 1976 - Led Zeppelin, Presence 1977 - Rush, A Farewell to Kings 1978 - Ace Frehley/Kiss, Ace Frehley 1979 - Pink Floyd, The Wall 1980 - Genesis, Duke 1981 - Rush, Moving Pictures 1982 - Rush, Signals 1983 - Iron Maiden, Piece of Mind 1984 - Iron Maiden, Powerslave 1985 - Kiss, Asylum 1986 - Queensrÿche, Rage for Order 1987 - Anthrax, Among the Living 1988 - Queensr
Album review: The Raconteurs – Consolers of the Lonely

Album review: The Raconteurs – Consolers of the Lonely

Music
I'm not sure if it can accurately be said that the Raconteurs' new album, Consolers of the Lonely, represents an unexpected left turn. After all, who's to say that their 2006 debut, Broken Boy Soldiers, isn't the aberration instead? Either way, fans looking for a repeat of the brilliant, trippy power pop of BBS would do best to just stick with that album. Consolers - steeped as it is in the blues, hard rock, and even vintage country - is an altogether different experience, so I expect the critics and fans to start taking sides now. The good news is that despite representing a radical departure in style, Consolers has groove and guts to spare, and it feels like a much more cohesive musical statement than BBS. Throughout, the Raconteurs play with supreme confidence and sounds like a...