Tag: London

Wire Service: London Hospital 1928

Wire Service: London Hospital 1928

Photography
September 8, 1928 – ABOVE LONDON’S CHIMNEY POTS – On the roof of the West London Hospital, situated in the busy Hammersmith quarter of the great Metropolis, has just been constructed a sand pit. This enables the child-patients to enjoy the delights of the sea-side which would otherwise be impossible. Our picture shows some of the children in the sand-pit.
Summing Up My Thoughts on the London 2012 Summer Olympics

Summing Up My Thoughts on the London 2012 Summer Olympics

Sports
Over the last several days of the 2012 Summer Olympics, I was struck by the feeling I get when I visit family out of state for long trips. There's the planning, the buildup and anticipation, and then the big day comes. I'm finally reunited for the first time in awhile, and it feels great. But then, as the days march on the newness of the experience gives way to a creeping feeling of anxiousness. By the end, even if the trip has gone well, I can't wait to be back home and back to my daily routine. In much the same way, I couldn't wait for the London Games to be over even though I eagerly anticipated them for several months earlier this year. I dutifully plopped myself in front of the TV for the prime time package most nights, and even checked out several live events on the internet, ...
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 — Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 — Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s

Featured Posts, Vintage Photo Wednesday
This is the first of what I hope will be a long-running feature on the site. Each Wednesday I'll post a handful of vintage photographs that strike my fancy. Some weeks there will be a theme, others not so much. If you have any subjects you'd like me to look for, or have photos you'd like to share, let me know! This week's collection is drawn from the Photochrom Print Collection on the Library of Congress website. From the site: The Photochrom Print Collection has almost 6,000 views of Europe and the Middle East and 500 views of North America. Published primarily from the 1890s to 1910s, these prints were created by the Photoglob Company in Zürich, Switzerland, and the Detroit Publishing Company in Michigan. The richly colored images look like photographs but are actually ink-based phot
Presenting your 2012 London Olympic medal designs

Presenting your 2012 London Olympic medal designs

Sports
So we've already established that the logo for the 2012 London Summer Olympics is an abomination, but what about the medals? Well, they're half an abomination. See for yourself: The front of the medals feature "the traditional image of the Greek Goddess of Victory, Nike, stepping out of the Parthenon to arrive in the Host City." Dammit, is there anything Nike can't get their image on at this point? Really it's not so bad. But then there's the reverse side, with that hideous logo staring me right in the face. It's supposed to be a metaphor for modern London. It also contains a portrayal of the River Thames to reflect London, and a square to break up the medal's circular design and “emphasise its focus on the centre.” See, even the designer (David Watkins) knows it's so awful that
Retrotisement: Video Music Dynamite from 1986!

Retrotisement: Video Music Dynamite from 1986!

Advertising, Retrotisements
If you're about my age and love music, then you no doubt owned at least one music video collection from MusicVision. If you need to job your memory, think VHS collections of music videos from your favorite bands packaged in those gray boxes. Here's a classic ad from July 1986 featuring a bunch of them: Now this is what I call music! Of course it makes sense that two of the hottest bands of '86 -- Starship and Mr. Mister -- are prominently featured here. But let's not forget Country Comes Alive (with Kenny Rogers, Ronnie Milsap, Waylon Jennings, Alabama, Juice Newton, the Judds, and more!), Whodini, and Chess Moves, a set of original songs from the London musical Chess! Oh, and it's also available on Beta! Related articles Retrotisements - Classic ads from car companies of th...
Listening Booth — Queen, “High Voltage” (London 1974)

Listening Booth — Queen, “High Voltage” (London 1974)

Listening Booth, Music
God I miss Freddie Mercury, don't you? Thankfully we have a treasure trove of studio albums, concert videos, and of course bootlegs. Because Freddie was always at his best when he had a crowd in the palm of his hand. This particular crowd watched Queen perform at the Rainbow Theatre in London on March 31, 1974. That's just over three weeks after the release of the awesome Queen II album. This show -- which I acquired with the title High Voltage -- is just seven songs long but is full of energy and great playing by the whole band. Roger Taylor is a beast on the drums, and of course Brian May (who gets his showcase on "Son and Daughter" and busts out a solo that will remind fans of the one on "Brighton Rock") rules at all times. And let's not forget the ever-solid John Deacon on bass. ...
Sunday Jazz: The Bill Evans Trio, “Waltz for Debby” (1965)

Sunday Jazz: The Bill Evans Trio, “Waltz for Debby” (1965)

Music, Sunday Jazz
More than 30 years after pianist Bill Evans' death, his legacy still towers over the jazz landscape. I can't imagine a pianist worth their salt who hasn't had their playing informed by his style in one way or another, even if subconsciously. Ample evidence of this exists, in particular the double whammy of classic 1961 live albums, Sunday at the Village Vanguard and Waltz for Debby. Evans led a number of fantastic trios over the years, and this is one of the better ones. It features Chuck Israels on bass and Larry Bunker on drums. This clip is from a March 19, 1965 performance in London, broadcast on the legendary BBC program Jazz 625. It's the Bill Evans Trio performing the Miles Davis composition "Nardis." Related articles Music Diary Notes: A Golden Anniversary of Jazz Trium...
Listening Booth – Karl Jenkins, “Agnus Dei”

Listening Booth – Karl Jenkins, “Agnus Dei”

Listening Booth
I first heard this composition on one of the many classical collections I acquired to help relax my son at night.  I was struck at once by the beauty of the piece, from the choral performance to the chord structure and arrangement.  This particular selection, "Agnus Dei", is the tenth movement of Karl Jenkins' The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace, which debuted in London in April 2000.  The entire Mass is well worth hearing, but this is by far my favorite selection. In a rather sad coincidence, the first CD edition of this Mass was released one day before the September 11 terrorist attacks.  Bummer.
Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Book report: The Murrow Boys: Pioneers on the Front Lines of Broadcast Journalism

Books
It's hard to imagine, especially for those of my generation or younger, but broadcast news was not always a wasteland of vacuous celebrity gossip, shallow political "analysis", or crude sensationalism.  There was in fact a time when the men and women who called themselves broadcast journalists were actually journalists first, broadcasters secondly.  A time when networks valued the insight and knowledge these broadcasters brought, with not nearly as much regard for profit. And for a period of almost 20 years starting in the late 1930s, there was one group of broadcast journalists more insightful, knowledgeable, professional, and popular than all others.  They were the Murrow Boys, started and led by the legendary Edward R. Murrow.  While most people still know his name, the names of the