Tag: mascots

Let’s Look At Some Vintage 1960s McDonald’s Advertisements

Let’s Look At Some Vintage 1960s McDonald’s Advertisements

Retrotisements
So I'm cruising through eBay looking for more vintage ads to share, and I happened upon a group of excellent ones from the early-to-mid 1960s. They're not flashy by any means, but they offer just a little slice of Mickey D's life from the Kennedy era and beyond. Most importantly, all of these black-and-white print ads feature vintage McDonald's branding and building designs as seen in my post detailing the history of some fast food logos, so it should come as no surprise that I had to share these. First up are four ads printed throughout 1961 in the Cincinnati Enquirer. All but one feature the classic mid-century arch building design, and we even get an appearance from Speedee! (Click on any ad to be taken to a full-size version on my Flickr page.) A free bagpipe band ...
Vintage Burger King Logos Help Celebrate the Anniversary of the Whopper

Vintage Burger King Logos Help Celebrate the Anniversary of the Whopper

Advertising
Unbeknownst to me until last weekend, Burger King is raising a big fuss to celebrate the 55th year of its Whopper sandwich. I've been known to patronize their restaurant from time to time, so imagine my delight when I saw that they're splashing their old logos all over their food packaging. Below are scans I took recently, featuring vintage Burger King logos of the past: This is the original Burger King logo, and dates from the around very beginning of the franchise -- once known as Insta-Burger King -- in 1955 all the way through the 1960s. You can get a larger version here. Here's the next version of the mascot -- apparently also known as Kurger Bing according to Wikipedia -- which debuted in 1971. He lasted until the late '70s, when he was replaced by the more realistic-lo
The Best and Worst Major League Baseball Logos (NL East)

The Best and Worst Major League Baseball Logos (NL East)

Sports
With the 2012 Major League Baseball season nearly upon us, now is as good a time as any to obsess once again on one of my favorite topics — logos. So I’m going to offer up my choices for the best and worst team logos for all 30 current MLB franchises. Primary, alternate, and cap logos listed on Chris Creamer’s outstanding logo website are all under consideration. Today, for the final installment, I look at the five squads of the National League’s East division. (Other recaps — AL West, NL West, AL Central, NL Central, AL East) Atlanta Braves Best The whole Atlanta Braves look from the '70s was one of the best in modern baseball, and that includes the primary logo seen here (used until 1986). A close second for this spot was the distinctive feather logo used on the jersey sleeves.
The Best and Worst Major League Baseball Logos (NL Central)

The Best and Worst Major League Baseball Logos (NL Central)

Sports
With the 2012 Major League Baseball season nearly upon us, now is as good a time as any to obsess once again on one of my favorite topics — logos. So I’m going to offer up my choices for the best and worst team baseball logos for all 30 current MLB franchises. Primary, alternate, and cap logos listed on Chris Creamer’s outstanding logo website are all under consideration. Today I look at the six squads of the National League’s Central division. (Other recaps — AL West, NL West, AL Central) Chicago Cubs Best This is the only Cubs logo I've ever known, and I assumed it always looked like this. Alas, this particular variant of the primary design introduced in 1937 has only been in use since 1979. Still, seems kind of timeless, no? Worst It had been not quite 20 years since the
McDonald’s and Burger King Wish You a Happy and Groovy Valentine’s Day!

McDonald’s and Burger King Wish You a Happy and Groovy Valentine’s Day!

Ephemera
It's almost Valentine's Day once again, which means love is in the air. Well, love and greasy fried crap. So to celebrate Fast Food Love, American Style, let's check out this gallery of Valentine's Day cards from McDonald's and Burger King. Up first is a set from the McDonaldland gang, circa 1973/74.   For an even groovier Valentine's Day experience let's take a left turn to the Burger King Kingdom, where the visage of the Burger King beams at us from this set of postcards. These were produced in 1972 and feature a clean-shaven, decidedly un-scary King. (card scans via Flickr user Waffle Whiffer)
Retrotisements — Breakfast Cereal Bonanza!

Retrotisements — Breakfast Cereal Bonanza!

Advertising, Retrotisements
Ah, cold breakfast cereal. A little bit of heaven in a bowl, yes? I subscribe to the theory that you're never too old to enjoy a big bowl of cereal. I also believe that all it takes to feel young again is to sit back and watch some vintage cereal commercials, so here we go! Lucky Charms Is it just me, or do kids usually come off as really obnoxious in these ads? Frosted Flakes That's Tony the Tiger as voiced by the legendary Thurl Ravenscroft, of course. Apple Jacks Ah! Can't sleep, giant Apple Head will eat me... Quisp & Quake I think I choose the one who doesn't sound like a really bad Catskills night club act. Cap'n Crunch Ah yes, those villainous Soggies. The last line of defense between this cereal and a shredded mouth. (more…)
What’s so funny about insurance?

What’s so funny about insurance?

Advertising
It used to be that insurance commercials were created to convey one thing above all else — a feeling of total security and warm fuzziness that Company X was going to be there for you after your house blew up or your car got flattened by a rampaging elephant. Ad campaigns from agencies like Nationwide, State Farm, and Allstate were full of sensible people making sensible decisions. The slogans drove this theme home even more succinctly: Nationwide was on your side, you were in good hands with Allstate, and so on. But somewhere along the way things changed and insurance companies decided to start getting a bit cutesy with their ads. The Aflac Duck (voiced by the unlikely pitchman Gilbert Gottfried) debuted nationally in 1999, while local companies such as Chicago-based Eagle Insuranc