Tag: NBC

Cool Stuff: Name That Tune Control Box from NBC

Cool Stuff: Name That Tune Control Box from NBC

Auction Finds
Here's a really cool piece of vintage TV technology I came across. It's the control box from the NBC game show Name That Tune, which aired on the network from 1952-1954, 1974-75, and 1977. The auction for this box claims it's from the '50s version of the show, which I suppose is possible, except for one thing that contradicts that. See if you can guess what it is. This certainly looks simple enough to be from the 1950s, but a few things make me think it's from the '70s. The first is the faux wood grain DYMO label tape, which I don't think was around in the '50s. But mostly, that NBC logo on the "Made by NBC Electric Shop" label looks newer. Unless this was used internally for a few decades before the public saw it, it's most definitely from the '70s. In fact, that trapezoid N rol
Fall TV Preview Madness! (NBC Saturday Mornings, 1985)

Fall TV Preview Madness! (NBC Saturday Mornings, 1985)

TV & Radio
I’m counting down the days until the Fall 2012 television season gets underway the only way I know how — by bringing you network promos for TV seasons long gone. Today’s preview is for NBC's 1985 Saturday Morning lineup of children's shows. NBC ran a yearly special previewing their upcoming season of Saturday morning shows from 1973 to 1991. The '85 special was called Back to Next Saturday -- cashing in on the popularity of Back to the Future -- and it starred the likes of Keshia Knight Pulliam (The Cosby Show) and Lisa Whelchel (The Facts of Life), as well as the casts of It's Punky Brewster and Kidd Video. Unlike the prime time previews, Back to Next Saturday went to the trouble of concocting a storyline. Pulliam enters the Dream Zone, otherwise known as your typical tropical isla
Fall TV Preview Madness! (NBC, 1975)

Fall TV Preview Madness! (NBC, 1975)

TV & Radio
In Fall TV Preview Madness, I present a network television schedule preview special from the distant past. We see the good, bad, and ugly for a network's entire upcoming fall slate. Today's preview is for NBC's 1975 Fall TV season, dubbed the Superseason. The network debuted nine new series, hoping to build on the successes of young hits like Little House on the Prairie, Chico and the Man, and Sanford and Son. Their boldest play came on Thursday, where the entire prime time lineup was filled with freshman shows. Here's a quick promo from '75. Unfortunately, success proved elusive for these new programs, none of which lasted past the 1975-76 season. Thursday in particular was rough, as NBC was up against ratings powerhouses like The Waltons and The Streets of San Francisco. Th...
Summing Up My Thoughts on the London 2012 Summer Olympics

Summing Up My Thoughts on the London 2012 Summer Olympics

Sports
Over the last several days of the 2012 Summer Olympics, I was struck by the feeling I get when I visit family out of state for long trips. There's the planning, the buildup and anticipation, and then the big day comes. I'm finally reunited for the first time in awhile, and it feels great. But then, as the days march on the newness of the experience gives way to a creeping feeling of anxiousness. By the end, even if the trip has gone well, I can't wait to be back home and back to my daily routine. In much the same way, I couldn't wait for the London Games to be over even though I eagerly anticipated them for several months earlier this year. I dutifully plopped myself in front of the TV for the prime time package most nights, and even checked out several live events on the internet, ...
This Ragú Ad Made It Worth Watching the Summer Olympics

This Ragú Ad Made It Worth Watching the Summer Olympics

Advertising
So I'm watching the Summer Olympics last night on NBC, and this commercial pops up: Yup, this is an ad -- titled "A Long Day of Childhood: Parent's Bedroom"  -- for Ragú pasta sauce, and it's the best commercial I've seen in a long time. Certainly better than any of the ads I saw during the last Super Bowl, and much better than synchronized swimming. Thankfully I never walked in on my parents the way this kid did, but I know others who have. *shivers* And hey, am I the only one who didn't know that you were supposed to spell Ragú with that little accent mark? When did that start?
Get the Lead Out — A History of Series Debuts After the Super Bowl

Get the Lead Out — A History of Series Debuts After the Super Bowl

TV & Radio
I still have pretty vivid memories of watching television on the evening of Super Bowl XXII. Not just because it was the day that the hated Denver Broncos got pummeled by the Redskins, but it was also the premiere of The Wonder Years on ABC. It instantly became one of my favorite shows, and I watched it faithfully for most if its entire run. As it turns out, The Wonder Years was also one of the more successful shows to launch right after the Super Bowl. Let's take a look at the history of TV series to debut after the big game and see how many we can remember. 1979: Brothers and Sisters (NBC), Super Bowl XIII It wasn't until the thirteenth Super Bowl that a network struck on the idea of capitalizing on a huge built-in audience to roll out a new series. You can't blame them if they had
Saturday Night Live is just now catching on to Millennials

Saturday Night Live is just now catching on to Millennials

TV & Radio
Holy crap, was it really more than four years ago that I wrote my little love letter to Millennials? Why, it's like not a day has gone by since then that I don't choke on my own bile as these insanely privileged and irrationally entitled oxygen wasters skip through life with their heads lodged firmly up their asses. Wait, what was I going to talk about before I became blinded with fury? Oh yes, Saturday Night Live. Their recent Daniel Radcliffe-hosted episode featured a sketch called "You Can Do Anything!", which pretty much sums up some of the feelings I posted in that letter. But in comedy sketch form. Polish your participation trophy and check it out. Yup, that about covers it.
Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Internet, Links
Here’s a fresh batch of some quality interweb finds I’ve come across over the last 7 days: For the 5 or 6 people who haven't seen Charlie Sheen's interviews on NBC's Today and ABC's Good Morning America, watch them now and start winning. (Television Blend) A thought-provoking piece on music listening, and how long it should take to "get" an album before writing about it. (The AV Club) Was a Vanity Fair editor secretly working for the Church of Scientology? (The New York Observer) Ruh roh — Infamous NHL tough guy Bob Probert was suffering from degenerative brain disease when he died last year. (Deadspin) The Jersey Shore, as it was in 1910 before infected with the likes of Snooki and the Situation. (Shorpy) Vengeance Dad, meet Karate Kyle. (Know Your Meme) Did Americans