Tag: New Orleans

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1958 – 1992)

Vintage 20th Century World’s Fair Postcards (1958 – 1992)

Ephemera
Back for more, eh? As the follow-up to my set of World's Fair postcards covering the first half of the 20th century, here is the second half. This set picks up with Expo 58 in Brussels, which marked the first World's Fair held after World War II. Expo 58 (Brussels, Belgium) Century 21 Exposition (Seattle, 1962) (via Drive-In Mike) 1964 New York's World Fair (via The Pie Shops) Expo 67 (Montreal) (via The Pie Shops) HemisFair '68 (San Antonio, Texas) (via zawleski) Expo '70 (Osaka, Japan) (via Duncan Brown) Expo '74 (Spokane, Washington) (via The Pie Shops) Expo '75 (Okinawa, Japan) (via World's Fair Photos) 1982 World's Fair (Knoxville, Tennessee) 1984 Louisiana World Exposition (New Orleans) Expo '85 (Tsukuba, Japan) (via World's Fair Photos) Expo...
Listening Booth – Tab Benoit, “So High”

Listening Booth – Tab Benoit, “So High”

Listening Booth, Music
This popped up on a last.fm mix the other day, and I stopped what I was doing and proceeded to dance around the room like a mental patient.  I figure this little blues boogie is as good a way as any to kick off the week, now that spring is at the doorstep and the last vestiges of snow are melting away. It's Tab Benoit with "So High", off of his 1992 debut album Nice & Warm.  This is recommended for fans of Stevie Ray Vaughan, although this has more of a New Orleans flavor than a Texas one.
Book report: The Witching Hour

Book report: The Witching Hour

Books
Having only read one other Anne Rice novel (you guessed it, Interview With the Vampire), I learned some interesting things about her from reading her beefy 1990 tome, The Witching Hour.  I learned that she can make a book interesting even if there are actually no vampires in it.  I learned that New Orleans, in addition to being a magical place indeed, has some really beautiful flowers.  And I learned that Anne Rice sure knows a lot of different ways to describe human genitalia. So yes, the book is interesting and even engrossing in parts and starts off with real promise. In the bar of a New York hotel a doctor remembers a most disturbing assignment - administering tranquilizing drugs to a young, catatonic woman named Deirdre.  But rather than living as a patient in a mental hospital, De
Album review – From the Plantation to the Penitentiary

Album review – From the Plantation to the Penitentiary

Music
Mention the name Wynton Marsalis in some jazz circles and people will look at you as if you had just ripped a particularly loud fart. Due to his rather outspoken opinions on the validity of more traditional jazz styles over newer ones, he has been viewed alternately as a savior and a fossil. This was only exacerbated by his ubiquitousness throughout Ken Burns' controversial Jazz miniseries. Given this, it may not be possible for some to objectively approach his work - including his newest release, From the Plantation to the Penitentiary. Luckily for me, I never really paid attention to any of that controversy. However, I honestly never paid any attention to his music either. I decided to give this album a shot after seeing Marsalis's recent appearance on The Daily Show. And I have ...