Tag: New York

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 24: Holland Tunnel Opening, 1927

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 24: Holland Tunnel Opening, 1927

Vintage Photo Wednesday
Here's another tunnel-related vintage photo for you. Although the source (New York Public Library Digital Gallery) doesn't note the year, I'm going with 1927. Take a look and you'll see why. (Click for a larger version.) The reason I'm going with 1927 is because the Holland Tunnel, which connects Manhattan with Jersey City, opened in November 1927. I don't imagine that these unnamed officials, decked out in their late '20s finery, would be taking pictures and shaking hands across the border in the middle of construction. Or maybe they did, who knows. Update: An astute reader identifies the two men shaking hands as New York and New Jersey governors Al Smith and A. Harry Moore, respectively. Thanks! Related articles On This Day In 1927, The Holland Tunnel Appears On The Cover
Time Capsule: Puck Magazine Thanksgiving Political Covers, 1894-1913

Time Capsule: Puck Magazine Thanksgiving Political Covers, 1894-1913

Capsules, Ephemera
Published from 1871 until 1918, Puck magazine was America's first successful humor magazine featuring cartoons and political satire. Their Thanksgiving covers, while not always political, usually were and are still fun to look at today even if the relevance has been lost to time. Their choice of makes sense when you know that they were based out of New York City. Tammany Hall, which we all heard about in history class but have since forgotten, figures prominently. Here's a selection of Puck's Thanksgiving covers from around the turn of the 20th century, courtesy the Library of Congress. That's prominent New York politician David B. Hall, who we'll see again in 1902. He lost the NY gubernatorial race in 1894 to Levi P. Morton. Tammany Hall was a frequent target for ...
Vintage Photo Wednesday: Back to Old School

Vintage Photo Wednesday: Back to Old School

Vintage Photo Wednesday
Related articles Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 1 - Photochrom Prints, 1890s-1900s Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 8 - Radiation Dummy Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 4 - Baseball Images of Yesteryear Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 5 - 1950s Family Nuclear Fallout Shelter Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 9 - Republican National Conventions Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 2 - New York City Street Views, 1896
Listening Booth — The Rolling Stones, “Mother’s Little Helper”

Listening Booth — The Rolling Stones, “Mother’s Little Helper”

Listening Booth, Music
Last night's excellent Mad Men episode ("Tea Leaves") featured Don Draper and Harry Crane's funny attempt to snag the Rolling Stones for a Heinz commercial. Based on the dialogue in the show, the concert seems to be from July 2, 1966. The Stones played that night at the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium in Queens, New York. Their latest single from the Aftermath album -- "Mother's Little Helper" -- had just come out that day in America, although it doesn't appear to have made the band's setlist. So here it is, Mad Men and Rolling Stones fans -- "Mother's Little Helper," featuring Brian Jones playing that distinctive guitar part on his Vox 12-string Mando-Guitar.
Road Trip! — Ten Songs Inspired by Real Places

Road Trip! — Ten Songs Inspired by Real Places

Featured Posts, Listcruft, Music
Many people are inspired by their favorite songs about places to visit the locations that inspired them. But don't bother looking for 22 Acacia Avenue or Xanadu on Google Maps -- they don't exist anywhere but in their songwriters' minds. Elsewhere, however, there are plenty of songs that were inspired by real places. Here are ten of them, should you feel the urge to make a pilgrimage. (You can also check out this list on my Spotify playlist.) #1. "Lakeside Park" -- Rush Rush drummer and lyricist Neil Peart grew up in Port Dalhousie, Ontario and spent many youthful summers on the village's most popular beach -- Lakeside Park. Peart paid tribute in an atypically nostalgic song on Rush's third album, 1975's Caress of Steel. Peart later reminisced about his Lakeside Park experience
Album Cover of the Week: For Twisters Only

Album Cover of the Week: For Twisters Only

Album Cover of the Week, Music
If there has ever been artists to get a ton of mileage out of one song, it's Chubby Checker and "The Twist." Yeah I know he had other hits in the '60s, but Checker hasn't been able to milk "Pony Time" for everything from song sequels to ads for Oreo cookies and the Social Security Administration. Today's featured album cover comes from Checker's commercial prime. It's a 1961 covers album entitled For Twisters Only, and it was clearly meant to capitalize on his biggest song, which had hit #1 in 1960. Surprisingly this LP (Parkway Records, P 7002) did not contain "The Twist" at all, but rather a host of hits from the '50s such as "Hound Dog," "Rock Around the Clock," and "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On." Graphically this is primitive but appealing. There's the obvious choice of a ...
Gray Flannel Fotos: The Ten Commandments in Lake George

Gray Flannel Fotos: The Ten Commandments in Lake George

Photography
Here's a classic from the archives that I just got around to processing. It was taken in the Valley View Chapel, located on Route 9N in Ticonderoga, New York. I and Mrs. Suit happened upon this while driving around on vacation in Lake George several years ago, on a crisp autumn afternoon. The chapel, which was founded in 1901, sits adjacent to a cemetery. It's not evident from this photograph, but the chapel appears to be little more than a tourist attraction at this point. The doors were all left wide open (this was October, mind you) and dead leaves fluttered all around the small chapel. Still, most of the structure and furniture appear to be in decent shape. I shot this because I always love the look of stained glass in churches, and the design on this one is simple yet striki...