Tag: Nirvana

Pop Culture Capsule — January 5-11, 1992

Pop Culture Capsule — January 5-11, 1992

Capsules, History
Here’s a look at America’s top movies, music, and books for the week of January 5-11, 1992. While a lot of the Top 10 movies have since faded into the mists of memory, look at those albums. Most of those were huge then and are still. Sorry MC Hammer, no one cares about you anymore. Note: Old Nielsen TV ratings seem to be hard to come by, so if anyone can point me toward a reliable source I'd be most appreciative. Top 10 Movies 1. Hook 2. Father of the Bride 3. The Prince of Tides 4. Beauty and the Beast 5. JFK 6. The Last Boy Scout 7. Bugsy 8. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country 9. The Addams Family 10. Cape Fear I can say that I've only seen two of the movies on this list. Can you guess which ones? Top 10 Albums 1. Nirvana, Nevermind 2. Garth Brooks, Ropin' the Wind
New Adventures in Hi-Fi: My Journey Into R.E.M., Introduction

New Adventures in Hi-Fi: My Journey Into R.E.M., Introduction

Music
Several years ago (damn I've been doing this blog a long time) I posted a list of some of the biggest artists in music and confessed that I had not bothered to check them out beyond knowing some of their biggest hits. Last weekend I checked out several episodes of the 2007 BBC series Seven Ages of Rock on VH1 Classic, and got caught up in the one covering alternative rock. It covered bands like Nirvana and the Pixies, whom I've already auditioned and found wanting.  Another band heavily featured in the episode was R.E.M. And you know, the fact is I have never really given them a proper chance. I know how important they supposedly are in the world of alternative rock and of course I'm very familiar with their biggest hits, but as I was never all that much into alt rock I had little r
Album cover of the week: Ten

Album cover of the week: Ten

Album Cover of the Week
As if I needed yet another reminder of how old I'm getting - 2011 marks the 20th anniversary of Ten, the debut album from Pearl Jam (although it wasn't released until August '91).   For many music fans this album (perhaps alongside Nirvana's Nevermind) heralded the end of the Age of Hair Metal, which was either a good or bad thing depending on your outlook. But rather than focus on the music, let's take a look at the artwork from Ten. This is the CD art that most of us are familiar with (especially since Ten has sold close to 10 million copies).  I've always liked this image, subtle as it is.  It effectively conveys the whole tight-knit, brotherhood sort of vibe I've always associated with Pearl Jam.  It's a strikingly positive image, which stands in stark contrast to the rather