Tag: Oakland Raiders

Football Friday: A Gallery of Vintage AFL Game Programs

Football Friday: A Gallery of Vintage AFL Game Programs

Football Friday, Sports
  One of these days, when I'm independently wealthy, I'm going to amass the largest collection of American Football League game programs around. Until then, I'll just pick them up on eBay from time to time and collect scans from the internet. Here is but a sampling of cover images from AFL game programs during the ten-year existence of the league. Much like the AFL itself, these programs reflect a great deal of character and color. To see more of these great old programs, check out the AFL program gallery on the main site. (more…)
Carson Palmer — The next Jim Plunkett or Jeff George?

Carson Palmer — The next Jim Plunkett or Jeff George?

Sports
It's been a day since the Raiders landed Carson Palmer in a trade with the Bengals, and I'm still not sure what to think (hot dog jokes aside). While I can't get on board yet with the idea that Oakland will ride Palmer to the AFC title, I also can't agree with the pundits and fans who instantly declared this a swindle on Cincy's part. In terms of the trade terms -- it will be a lot easier to tell if a first-round draft pick next year and a first or second rounder in 2013 is too steep a price to pay for a QB many think is past his prime. After all, if Palmer can lead the Raiders into the AFC championship, won't that be worth the loss of two picks that may or may not work out anyway? I have to say that what makes me most uneasy is that I remember watching post-knee injury Palmer strugg...
Remembering Al Davis (1929 – 2011)

Remembering Al Davis (1929 – 2011)

People, Sports
You need to know two things about me to get some context for this post. One, I've been an Oakland Raiders fan for just about 30 years, which means I've seen some sweet highs and a lot of dismal lows. Two, I am not a professional journalist and so I haven't had an Al Davis tribute ready to go for years -- which means these are my unedited, unprepared thoughts about the man in the minutes immediately after I heard about his death at age 82. I'm sure there are other articles and tributes that can properly frame Al Davis's legacy in a way I can't, but it needs to be said -- if you have even a passing interest in the National Football League, take five seconds right now and thank Al Davis. He, along with men like Wellington Mara, Pete Rozelle, and Lamar Hunt, was one of the titans of profess...
Football Friday — Nine Oldest NFL stadiums

Football Friday — Nine Oldest NFL stadiums

Football Friday, Sports
Look around the NFL and you'll see that the days of the vintage stadium are nearly over. Of the league's 32 teams only nine play is stadiums built before the '90s, while 14 play in buildings opened since the turn of the 21st century. Let's take a look at those nine older stadiums, shall we? #1. Lambeau Field (1957) The home of the Green Bay Packers, Lambeau Field, is the oldest National Football League stadium currently in use. Until 1964 it went by its original name -- City Stadium -- but it was renamed to honor Curly Lambeau, Packers founder and long-time head coach. Lambeau underwent a renovation from 2001 to 2003, and now has a seating capacity of 73,128. The stadium is steeped in traditions both old and new. Most famously its playing surface is known as the Frozen Tundra, a...
Football Friday — The Bills and Raiders resume a long series

Football Friday — The Bills and Raiders resume a long series

Football Friday, Sports
Week 2 of the 2011 NFL season sees the resumption of an old AFL rivalry, when the Oakland Raiders travel east to play the Buffalo Bills. These two charter AFL franchises first met in that old league's inaugural 1960 season, and since then the Raiders have a slim 19-16 margin in regular season matchups. Two of those wins came in the 1968 AFL campaign, and I have the highlights of both games for you. Up first is the week 1 matchup, in which Oakland obliterated Buffalo on their home turf, 48-6. Oakland QB Daryle Lamonica, playing in his second season since being traded by the Bills, amassed 167 passing yards and threw for once TD. 92 of those passing yards (and the touchdown) came courtesy three completions to Warren Wells, while RB Hewritt Dixon ran for 104 yards and a score. T...
So long, Hightower

So long, Hightower

People
NFL and movie great Charles Aaron "Bubba" Smith, who has died at age 66, is now free to crush quarterbacks and Honda Civics in heaven. Let's take a look at some of his most memorable work, both in the NFL and in his post-football career. Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment Until It Hurts (Bubba's exercise video) Married... with Children (Al Bundy vs. Spare Tire Dixon) Baltimore Colts vs. Oakland Raiders (AFC Championship -- January 3, 1971) Smith (#78) knocked Raiders starting QB Daryle Lamonica out of the game (skip to the hit), and the Colts went on to a 27-17 victory. They advanced to Super Bowl V and beat the Dallas Cowboys, 16-13. Incidentally, it's a proven fact that hits in the NFL are twice as vicious when narrated by John Facenda. Related articles Bubba ...
Save your anger, NFL fans. No one cares.

Save your anger, NFL fans. No one cares.

Sports
The last thing the internet needs is another screed about the NFL lockout, but here's mine anyway. I'm not really interested in taking sides in the toxic blame game that the NFL owners (via their squirrely mouthpiece, Roger Goodell) and the NFLPA have been engaged in for weeks. What I'm more interested in is the fans who choose to take sides, and why they do so. At this point most of the resentment seems to be aimed squarely at the league's 32 owners. They're greedy, they're just trying to screw the poor, subjugated players, they're killing the golden goose, blah blah blah. I'm not defending the owners or how they've conducted themselves throughout this whole sordid affair. But neither can I get myself whipped up into a frenzy over what they're doing. Because I recognize them for wha...
Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Internet, Links
Here’s a fresh batch of some quality interweb finds I’ve come across over the last 7 days: Fantastic batch of color photos from the early 1900s taken by French banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn. (Citynoise) An fancy interactive map of heavy metal, with sub-genres I've never even heard of. (Map of Metal) Sports columnist Michael Rosenberg puts the epic fail of the 2010-11 Cleveland Cavaliers into perspective with a look at the worst single-season drop-offs ever. And look, my Oakland Raiders made the list! (CNNSI) Cool bootleg of the week; a reunion show featuring jazz greats Slim Gaillard and Slam Stewart (Slim & Slam to fans) at the 1970 Monterey Jazz Festival. (T.U.B.E.) An excellent column by Jennifer Floyd Engel on the recent dustup between Peter King and Jason W
Why I am now a Seattle Seahawks fan

Why I am now a Seattle Seahawks fan

Sports
For the next month (at most), I am switching my NFL allegiance from my beloved Oakland Raiders to the Seattle Seahawks.  Why?  Well a few reasons.  For one, I need a break from Al Davis and his batshit crazy ownership moves, like letting go of the first semi-competent head coach he's had in a decade (Tom Cable) and the best defensive player he's had in a decade (Nnamdi Asomugha). But don't worry, I'm no bandwagon fan.  As soon as the Seahawks either get dumped from the playoffs or win the whole damn thing at Super Bowl XLV (that means 73 in Italian, right?), it's back to the Silver & Black for me.  But I'm really hoping for the latter right now. It's not that I give a damn about the Seahawks, a former hated AFC West rival.  It's that they're doing such a marvelous job pissing off