Sunday, July 12
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Tag: Ontario

Road Trip! — Ten Songs Inspired by Real Places

Road Trip! — Ten Songs Inspired by Real Places

Featured Posts, Listcruft, Music
Many people are inspired by their favorite songs about places to visit the locations that inspired them. But don't bother looking for 22 Acacia Avenue or Xanadu on Google Maps -- they don't exist anywhere but in their songwriters' minds. Elsewhere, however, there are plenty of songs that were inspired by real places. Here are ten of them, should you feel the urge to make a pilgrimage. (You can also check out this list on my Spotify playlist.) #1. "Lakeside Park" -- Rush Rush drummer and lyricist Neil Peart grew up in Port Dalhousie, Ontario and spent many youthful summers on the village's most popular beach -- Lakeside Park. Peart paid tribute in an atypically nostalgic song on Rush's third album, 1975's Caress of Steel. Peart later reminisced about his Lakeside Park experience...
Album cover of the week: Moving Pictures

Album cover of the week: Moving Pictures

Album Cover of the Week, Music
Next month marks the 30th anniversary of Moving Pictures, one of the great albums of the '80s and - according to many fans - Rush's greatest achievement.  In addition to being packed from start to finish with all-time classics like "Tom Sawyer" and "Limelight", Moving Pictures is best remembered for its covert art.  It's visually striking and showcases the band's dry sense of humor (sorry Canadians, humour). Art direction and graphic design credits go to Hugh Syme, longtime Rush collaborator.  Syme has designed the cover for every Rush album since 1975's Caress of Steel, and this is one of his high water marks.  On the most obvious level we've got movers carrying three pictures - Joan of Arc on the left, one of C.M. Coolidge's Dogs Playing Poker paintings in the middle, and of cours...
A Loving Tribute to “Slave to the Metal”

A Loving Tribute to “Slave to the Metal”

Music
In the days before CD players, iPods and file sharing services became a part of everyday life (aka The Dark Ages), the mix tape was an essential part of a music lover's life. There were two varieties of mix tapes - homemade (for yourself or some girlfriend/boyfriend whose name you can't even remember anymore) and store-bought. Store-bought mix tapes (known in the industry as "compilations") were superior in two ways - they exposed you to bands you might have never heard before, and they didn't take five hours to put together on your crappy home stereo. During a road trip from New Jersey to Florida in the mid-'80s, I purchased my first mix tape at a Stuckey's in South Carolina. Or maybe it was North Carolina. No, it was South Carolina. Maybe Georgia. Anyway, being a proud metal he...