Tag: Phil Collins

Why the Hell Should I Like… Rush? (The Rebuttal)

Why the Hell Should I Like… Rush? (The Rebuttal)

Music
“Why the hell should I like… ?” is an experiment of sorts between Popblerd and The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. What we’re going to attempt to do is to pick 10 songs from our favorite artists — one for which the other has professed dislike or disinterest — and show them why they’re wrong. So, first of all, I've gotta give props to Mr. Gray Flannel Suit, not only for agreeing to collaborate with me on this series but also for rocking a gray flannel suit in the heat of summer. That's dedication. I don't dislike Rush. I just don't know much about them. Prior to listening to the list of songs that was selected for me, I had exactly ONE Rush song in an iTunes library that just recently crossed the 43,000-song mark -- "Tom Sawyer." No excuses -- I was brought up on Top 40 (and urban)
Sunday Jazz: Brand X, “Running on Three”

Sunday Jazz: Brand X, “Running on Three”

Music, Sunday Jazz
A lot of jazz fans cringe at the mere mention of the term "jazz fusion," and I can understand why. What started out in the late 1960s as an exciting blend of jazz's looser structure and penchant for improvisation with rock's raw power turned to utter crap by the end of the '70s. But there's a lot of great fusion out there, waiting to be discovered. And so today I present one of my favorite fusion groups -- Brand X. The talent in Brand X was staggering. The core group of John Goodsall (guitar), Percy Jones (bass), Robin Lumley (keyboards), and Phil Collins (drums, of course) released some fantastic music in the mid to late '70s. Their debut record, Unorthodox Behaviour, is quite simply one of the best examples of jazz fusion at its peak. So fusion lovers and fusion haters alike, feast...
Platters that matter: 20 albums that changed my life (#10—#1)

Platters that matter: 20 albums that changed my life (#10—#1)

Listcruft, Music
At long last, I present the conclusion of my list of 20 albums that have had the most impact on me and my love of music. For a brief refresher, you can check the back half of the top 20 here. But for your convenience, here's the list: #20 — Queen, The Game #19 — Seals & Crofts, Summer Breeze #18 — Kiss, Creatures of the Night #17 — Iron Maiden, The Number of the Beast #16 — Run-D.M.C., Raising Hell #15 — Kiss, Alive! #14 — Rush, A Farewell to Kings #13 — Miles Davis, Kind of Blue #12 — Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Pictures at an Exhibition #11 — various artists, Jazz Master Files OK, now that we're all caught up, let's finish this thing already. As a reminder, this is no particular order but I know people love countdowns so there you go. #10 — Genesis, Duke If Rus
Get to Know… Genesis – Pt. 1

Get to Know… Genesis – Pt. 1

Music
With the recent news of Phil Collins' retirement from music, I thought it would be a good time to run this two-part Genesis overview again (originally published on March 10, 2008). I think a proper assessment of Phil's whole career will reveal that he was an important figure in 20th century popular music, and all the cheesy Disney soundtracks in the world can't take away the great work he did. Since one of my favorite things in the whole world is telling people about music I love, I'm starting a series of overview articles dedicated to some of my favorite bands. Similar guides abound on the Internet, and two sites in particular that produce excellent ones are Popdose and the AV Club. The first entry in the series I've dubbed "Get to Know..." is for Genesis. Depending on your age,...
Gray Flannel Mixtape: The mellow side of prog

Gray Flannel Mixtape: The mellow side of prog

Music
To no one's surprise, last year's round of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees included not one progressive rock act.  This despite the millions of albums sold, the countless musicians inspired, and the long-lasting impact of the genre's best.  Hell, can anyone under 50 even name two Dave Clark Five songs?  Yeah, me neither. But to be fair, I can understand why someone not very familiar with prog rock might be inclined to write it off as so much boring instrumental wankery and bastardized classical music pastiches.  But to paint an endlessly rich style of music with such a broad brush is not only lazy, it's downright inaccurate.  So to show that prog ain't all clinical sweep arpeggios and no heart, I've put together a mixtape to showcase the gentler side of the genre. What we've got
Album cover of the week: Wind & Wuthering

Album cover of the week: Wind & Wuthering

Album Cover of the Week
OK, it's been a few weeks (more like four or five) since the last entry in this series, but what can I say?  I needed a break I guess.  But now that summer is a distant memory and the first frost of the season is almost upon us (in central Jersey anyway), I found some inspiration. This week's featured album art is the 1976 Genesis classic, Wind & Wuthering.  And I think you can see why. Beautiful, isn't it?  Reminds me a lot of Fleetwood Mac's Bare Trees actually, another album I really like.  It fits perfectly with the slightly chilly mood of the album, which turned out to be guitarist Steve Hackett's last with Genesis (leaving the trio of Phil Collins, Tony Banks, and Mike Rutherford). And surprise - this is another Hipgnosis effort!  Doesn't look like one, does it?  Col
Get to Know… Genesis – Pt. 2

Get to Know… Genesis – Pt. 2

Music
(Part 1 of my look at Genesis is here.) And so begins the second part of our exploration of the music of Genesis, now sans the costumes and theatrics of Peter Gabriel. After auditioning some well-known and unknown singers, the group finally decided to let drummer Phil Collins assume the mantle of frontman. It was a risky move, but one that reaped immediate dividends... A Trick of the Tail, 1976 (buy) Any doubts over Genesis' ability to function as a viable artistic unit post-Peter Gabriel were quelled with the release of A Trick of the Tail. While nothing on this album is quite as adventurous or weird as their previous work, it is no less satisfying. "Dance on a Volcano" gets things started with a bang, and sounds like it could have been recorded during the Lamb sessions. The ...