Tag: photography

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Here’s some stuff I enjoyed this week

Internet, Links
Here’s a fresh batch of some quality interweb finds I’ve come across over the last 7 days: Fantastic batch of color photos from the early 1900s taken by French banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn. (Citynoise) An fancy interactive map of heavy metal, with sub-genres I've never even heard of. (Map of Metal) Sports columnist Michael Rosenberg puts the epic fail of the 2010-11 Cleveland Cavaliers into perspective with a look at the worst single-season drop-offs ever. And look, my Oakland Raiders made the list! (CNNSI) Cool bootleg of the week; a reunion show featuring jazz greats Slim Gaillard and Slam Stewart (Slim & Slam to fans) at the 1970 Monterey Jazz Festival. (T.U.B.E.) An excellent column by Jennifer Floyd Engel on the recent dustup between Peter King and Jason W
The ’30s and ’40s in living color, Part 2

The ’30s and ’40s in living color, Part 2

Ephemera, History
November 2009 seems like ancient history to me, but that's when I published part one of my look at some of the most interesting color photos from the 1930s and 1940s (as presented on Flickr by the Library of Congress).  I love looking at pictures like these because even with the most mundane subjects, seeing them in color brings them to life in a way we never could before (unless you were there I guess). These photos were all taken between 1939 and 1944 by the United States Farm Security Administration (FSA) and later the Office of War Information (OWI).  Just click on a photo to see a larger version. (Part 1 can be seen here.) Even in the '40s no road sign was safe from the scourge of graffiti.  Although as one astute person pointed out, the markings on that railroad sign c
The ’30s and ’40s in living color, Part 1

The ’30s and ’40s in living color, Part 1

Ephemera, History
One of the really cool things about the internet is that now everyone who can get there can get access to a treasure trove of historical documents and photographs that were previously the domain of hardened researchers or supergeeks.  All you need is some time to spare and the desire to take a look at our country's not-so-distant past, and some great stuff is there for the asking.  Case in point, the Library of Congress WPA poster gallery I highlighted a few years ago. This time we're going to look at something even cooler - highlights from a LoC collection of photographs from the 1930s and '40s... in color!  While the subject matter isn't necessarily scintillating on all these, the opportunity to see life as it really looked back then is a rare treat indeed.  Something about seeing a s
Link of the day, 11/09/09

Link of the day, 11/09/09

Internet, Links
I'll probably pull some of these for a later article, but you should check out this sweet Flickr slideshow of color photographs from the 1930s and '40s. They're provided by the Library of Congress, who had another spectacular collection featured on this very site.
Album Cover of the Week: Undercurrent

Album Cover of the Week: Undercurrent

Album Cover of the Week
Less than a month after playing a series of shows at New York's fabled Village Vanguard jazz club in June 1961 - that would be immortalized with a pair of live albums, Sunday at the Village Vanguard and Waltz for Debby - Bill Evans was rocked by tragedy when his bassist and musical partner, Scott LaFaro, died in a car accident at age 25. Devastated, Evans recorded and performed very little for the rest of 1961 and the beginning of 1962.  In April and May of that year he entered the studio with guitarist Jim Hall and recorded the first album with his name on it since LaFaro's death - Undercurrent. This is the original album cover as released on the Blue Note label.  It's a very simple shot and yet a very powerful one.  The original image was taken in 1947 by famed photographer Ton