Tag: politics

A Pair of Suffragette Valentine’s Day Cards

A Pair of Suffragette Valentine’s Day Cards

Auction Finds, Ephemera
I thought I had seen every type of Valentine's Day card there was, but apparently I was wrong. Apparently it was a thing in the early 20th century to give out cards with a suffragette theme, as evidenced by the two cards I am sharing with you today. They both directly address the issue of a woman's right to vote, which as we know was granted with the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920. The first card, which I'm guessing was printed pre-1920, is pretty blunt in its message: I'll give you time to think it over! Fairest Suffragette Be My Valentine And With This Bracelet Link Your Hands & Fate With Mine The imagery of the handcuffs is pretty evocative, wouldn't you agree? The second card, which looks like it might have been produced after the 19th Amendment was ra...
Even the Great Pumpkin Is Voting Nixon-Agnew (1968)

Even the Great Pumpkin Is Voting Nixon-Agnew (1968)

Ephemera
Here's a very odd piece of political ephemera. It's a Halloween-themed jack-o-lantern door hanger used during the 1968 Richard Nixon/Spiro Agnew presidential campaign. In big, block letters it announced "Even the Great Pumpkin Is Voting Nixon-Agnew." This bit of ephemera is a clear nod to the classic Peanuts TV special It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. The CBS animated special debuted in October 1966 and was no doubt fresh in the minds of American voters. Whether or not this door hanger was enough to tip the scales in favor of the GOP ticket is debatable, but Nixon and Agnew cruised to a sizable Electoral College victory over Democrat Hubert Humphrey and running mate Edmund Muskie.
Celebrating More Than a Century of Government Corruption

Celebrating More Than a Century of Government Corruption

History
As the U.S. government shuts down once again in a display of petty brinksmanship, it's worth remembering that our Republican and Democrat friends have been pulling crap like this since day one. To illustrate that point, here's a fantastic illustration -- it's too nice to be called a cartoon -- from a July 1910 issue of Puck magazine. It shows us that, truly, there is nothing new under the political sun. Click for a larger version. In a bit of sad irony, I obtained this image from the website of the Library of Congress -- which is now shut down.
Photo Gallery: 1973-74 United States Oil Shortage Crisis, Vol. 1

Photo Gallery: 1973-74 United States Oil Shortage Crisis, Vol. 1

Capsules, Featured Posts, History
Ask anyone who was of driving age in the United States during the 1970s, and they likely remember well the two major oil shortage crises the country faced. The first oil shortage crisis, which lasted from October 1973 until March 1974, was set off when the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries, or the OAPEC (consisting of the Arab members of OPEC, plus Egypt, Syria and Tunisia), proclaimed an oil embargo. This was reportedly in response to the U.S. supplying Israel with arms following the 1973 Yom Kippur War. On October 16, 1973, OPEC announced a decision to raise the posted price of oil by 70%, to $5.11 a barrel. In the United States, the retail price of a gallon of gasoline rose from a national average of 38.5 cents in May 1973 to 55.1 cents in June 1974. President Richar
How Google Sees It: Michele Bachmann Hasn’t Changed Much

How Google Sees It: Michele Bachmann Hasn’t Changed Much

Funny Stuff
When last I checked on the Google instant search results for soon-to-be former Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann -- during her failed bid for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination -- she wasn't looking too good. And now that she has announced she's not going to seek re-election to her seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, I thought I'd see if her image has improved over the last few years. Nope. It seems that in addition to still being crazy and hot, Bachmann is now a racist. That's a shame. We'll always have the corn dog at least.
Time Capsule: Puck Magazine Thanksgiving Political Covers, 1894-1913

Time Capsule: Puck Magazine Thanksgiving Political Covers, 1894-1913

Capsules, Ephemera
Published from 1871 until 1918, Puck magazine was America's first successful humor magazine featuring cartoons and political satire. Their Thanksgiving covers, while not always political, usually were and are still fun to look at today even if the relevance has been lost to time. Their choice of makes sense when you know that they were based out of New York City. Tammany Hall, which we all heard about in history class but have since forgotten, figures prominently. Here's a selection of Puck's Thanksgiving covers from around the turn of the 20th century, courtesy the Library of Congress. That's prominent New York politician David B. Hall, who we'll see again in 1902. He lost the NY gubernatorial race in 1894 to Levi P. Morton. Tammany Hall was a frequent target for ...
Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 9 — Republican National Conventions

Vintage Photo Wednesday, Vol. 9 — Republican National Conventions

Vintage Photo Wednesday
As the GOP prepares to party in Tampa and nominate Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan to take on Barack Obama this November, I thought I'd take a look at Republican National Conventions gone by. Here's a selection of vintage photographs from GOP pow-wows starting with 1908 and ending with 1976. 1908 -- Chicago (William Howard Taft) 1912 -- Chicago (William Howard Taft) 1916 - Chicago (Charles Evans Hughes) 1920 -- Chicago (Warren G. Harding) 1936 -- Cleveland (Alf Landon) 1940 -- Philadelphia (Wendell Willkie) 1944 -- Chicago (Thomas E. Dewey) 1948 -- Philadelphia (Thomas E. Dewey) 1952 -- Chicago (Dwight D. Eisenhower) 1956 -- San Francisco (Dwight D. Eisenhower) 1960 -- Chicago (Richard M. Nixon) 1964 -- San Francisco (Barry Goldwater) 1968 -- Miami Beach 1...